Caesar's Army: A Study of the Military Art of the Romans in the Last Days of the Republic

By Harry Pratt Judson. | Go to book overview

eral cohorts in a hollow square. This latter might have been made circular, to resist attack at the angles. A legion could form the square by placing the first, second, and third cohorts in front, the eighth, ninth, and tenth in the rear, the fifth and sixth in the right, and the fourth and seventh on the left. There would then be a front of 360 ft. and a flank of 320. The inner hollow space would be 280 ft. long and 240 ft. broad, thus making 67,200 sq. ft. This would contain more than 1000 pack-animals.

§ 71. Under some circumstances we read also of a quadruple line of battle. This was designed to meet a flank attack. Some cohorts were taken from the rear line (tertia acies) and placed in line on the right (or left) flank at right angles with the main line of battle.

C. III, 89.


B.

THE ORDER OF MARCH.

The order of march is developed from the battle array So we must begin with the cohort.


I. THE COHORT.

§ 72. The line of march (agmen) of the cohort was one of two, — column of maniples and column of centuries.

§ 73. The column of maniples (manipulatim) was formed from order of battle by merely facing to the right (or left). Thus the maniples, it will be seen, were in column (Fig. 20), and the centuries in each maniple were side by side. If the cohort was faced to the right, the order was pilani, principes, hastati. As the depth of the cohort in line of battle was 40 ft., of course the column of maniples was 40 ft. wide. But this was a loose order. Allowing 3 ft. to each man, the column could easily have been made only

-46-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Caesar's Army: A Study of the Military Art of the Romans in the Last Days of the Republic
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Caesar's Army - A Study of the Military Art of the Romans in the Last Days of the Republic. *
  • Preface *
  • Contents *
  • List of Illustrations *
  • Abbreviations *
  • I - The Organization. *
  • 1 - The Infantry of the Legion. *
  • 2 - The Standards. 13
  • 3 - The Music. 15
  • 4 - The Baggage Train. 16
  • 5 - The Auxiliary Infantry. 18
  • 6 - The Cavalry. 19
  • 7 - The Artillery. 20
  • 8 - The Staff and Staff Troops. 26
  • II - The Legionary. *
  • 1 - Enlistment. *
  • 2 - Clothing. 32
  • 3 - Armor. 32
  • 4 - Arms. 33
  • 5 - Baggage. 36
  • 6 - Work. 36
  • 7 - Pay. 37
  • 8 - Discipline. 38
  • III - Tactics of the Legion. *
  • Military Terms *
  • A - Order of Battle. 41
  • B - The Order of March. 46
  • IV - Tactics of the Cavalry. *
  • V - Tactics of the Army. *
  • A - The Battle. *
  • B - The March. 62
  • C - The Camp. 70
  • D - The Siege. 87
  • VI - The Ships and Sea-Fights. *
  • VII - The Enemy. *
  • Maps of the Principal Campaigns and Plans of the Most Important Battles and Sieges of the Gallic War *
  • Gallia Antiqua *
  • Map of the Campaign of B. C.58 *
  • Map of the Campaign of B. C.57 *
  • Map of the Campaigns of B. C. 55,54, & 53 *
  • Britain in the Campaigns of B. C.55 & 54 *
  • Map of the Campaign of B. C. 52 *
  • Index of Latin Military Terms *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 127

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.