Dixiecrats and Democrats: Alabama Politics 1942-1950

By William D. Barnard | Go to book overview

NOTES

Introduction
1.
George B. Tindall, The Emergence of the New South 1913-1945, Vol. X in Wendell Holmes Stephenson and E. Merton Coulter, eds., A History of the South ([Baton Rouge], 1967), 731.
2.
Dixon's sentiments were expressed in a speech before the Southern So- ciety of New York, December 11, 1942. The subsequent quotations are taken from the version of this speech, "Crossroads Democracy," contained in Vital Speeches of the Day, Vol. 9 (February 1, 1943), 236-240. For an expression of similar sentiments, see another of Dixon's speeches, "The Dangers of Cen- tralization in Government," ibid., Vol. 8 (August 1, 1942), 621-624. See also, Tindall, Emergence of the New South, 724, for a brief account of the speech to the Southern Society.
3.
The following account of the 1944 Hill-Simpson contest and of its impor- tance as a test of anti-administration sentiment in the South is taken from the New York Times, December 17, 1943; April 15, May 3, 1944; and the Mobile Press, December 16, 19, 1943. The course of the campaign from a conservative anti-Hill and anti-New Deal point of view, can be followed in the Mobile Press, April 19 through May 4, 1944.
4.
Hill received 126,372 votes (55.5%), Simpson 101,176 (44.5%). Alabama Official and Statistical Register 1947 ( Montgomery, n. d. ), 428-429. Despite the closeness of the contest, Hill's primary victory in a deep South state over a conservative, anti-New Deal opponent was a source of satisfaction to the Roosevelt administration. Two days after the primary, General Edwin M. ("Pa") Watson, FDR's military aide and appointment secretary, wrote Stephen T. Early, the President's press secretary, that "the Boss asks without using his name that you convey to Hill and [Sen. Claude] Pepper [of Florida, who was involved in a similar race] how much the results have rejoiced him." Memoran- dum from General Watson to Mr. Early, May 4, 1944. Official File 300, Box 16, Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, N. Y.
5.
A. G. Mezerik, "Dixie in Black and White," The Nation, Vol. CLXIV (April 19, 1947), 449.

Chapter 1
1.
Birmingham News, March 31, 1946. The following discussion of Nixon's views is based on this citation. Later in 1946, Nixon presented his views in his Lower Piedmont Country (New York, 1946); see especially the chapter "Pied- mont Politics," 178-193.
2.
V. O. Key, Jr., Southern Politics in State and Nation (New York, 1949); C. Vann Woodward, Origins of the New South 1877-1913, Vol. IX in Wen-

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