Literary Copyright Reform in Early Victorian England: The Framing of the 1842 Copyright Act

By Catherine Seville | Go to book overview

7
AUTHORS AND THE BEGINNINGS OF
AUTHORS' ORGANISATIONS

With some notable but individual exceptions, most authors continued to sell their copyrights outright until nearly the end of the nineteenth century. Authorship was still relatively young as a profession, and attempts to unite it were, on the whole, unsuccessful.

The earliest known authors' organisation was the Society for the Encouragement of Learning, founded in 1735 to give authors a rightful share in the profits of their books.1 Jerdan's account is of a plan to publish works of 'sterling quality'.2 The committee of management included 'noblemen and scholars of the highest rank' as well as 'representatives of professional authorship'.3 It seems to have been a wholly philanthropic organisation, which did its own publishing and gave all profits to the authors. Although this aim proved unsustainable, it apparently alarmed the commercial book trade. Three booksellers were appointed, with a 33 per cent 'allowance', later reduced to 15 per cent. In fact the booksellers would neither buy nor sell the society's books, and putting the sales into the hands of adversaries was seen to be an error. Charles Rivington was an active member but 'as he and his colleagues sustained much injury through it, he withdrew from it'.4 The

____________________
1
This title mirrors a phrase from the preamble to the Act of Anne 1710.
2
William Jerdan, The plan of a National Association for the Encouragement and Protection of Authors, and Men of Talent and Genius (1839).
3
One of the latter was James Thomson, the popularity of whose Seasons had led to the great case of Millar v. Taylor, and ultimately to Donaldson v. Beckett. Thomson and Andrew Millar were old friends, and Thomson's loyalty to his publisher was very great. Even though Thomson was a committee member, Millar remained Thomson's publisher until the poet's death in 1748. Frank A. Mumby, The romance of book selling: a history from the earliest times to the twentieth century (1910), p. 233.
4
Septimus Rivington, The publishing family of Rivington (1919), p. 33.

-149-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Literary Copyright Reform in Early Victorian England: The Framing of the 1842 Copyright Act
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 300

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.