Literary Copyright Reform in Early Victorian England: The Framing of the 1842 Copyright Act

By Catherine Seville | Go to book overview

9
CONCLUSION

Although Archibald Alison considered it 'a disgrace to British legislation', legal commentators throughout the nineteenth century responded warmly and positively to the 1842 Copyright Act. Godson's Practical treatise had devoted considerable space to the exposition of Talfourd's proposals, as yet unpassed.1 The 1844 supplement to this declared the law respecting copyright in books to be 'much improved' since the last edition, 'by acts of Parliament, for which the public owe great thanks, as to copyright, to Mr Serjeant Talfourd'.2 Burke, who provided a further supplement to Godson's textbook in 1851, was still entirely supportive of Talfourd, to whom the public owed 'the happy amelioration of our Copyright law'.3 Another near-contemporary, Blaine, writing in 1853, described how the Statute of Anne 'cut down' the perpetual right in literary works to a short fourteen-year term, and noted that 'since that time instalments of justice have with the greatest difficulty been wrung from the Legislature'.4 A footnote attributed the 1842 Act to 'the generous and unwearied exertions of one of the most distinguished authors of modern times, Sir Thomas Noon Talfourd'.

In the 1870 first edition of Copinger, now a standard work, it was emphasised that the contemporary law of literary copyright depended on the 1842 Act. Again Talfourd's contribution is recognised: 'To Mr Serjeant Talfourd is due the honour of

____________________
1
Richard Godson, A practical treatise on the law of patents for inventions and of copyright, 2nd edn (1840), pp. 305–6, 316–18.
2
A supplement to the second edition of A Practical Treatise… (1844), pp. vii-viii.
3
Peter Burke, Supplement to Godson's practical treatise on the law of patents … (1851).
4
Delabere Roberton Blaine, On the laws of artistic copyright and their defects (1853), p.11.

-210-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Literary Copyright Reform in Early Victorian England: The Framing of the 1842 Copyright Act
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 300

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.