Acknowledgments

The revision of this book for its third edition took place intermittently over a three-year period from 1992 to 1995, and, as always, I incurred numerous intellectual debts in the process. Limits of time and space notwithstanding, I would like to thank the four reviewers of the second edition—Charles Ramirez Berg and Joann Hershfield of the University of Texas, John Koshel of Long Island University, and, especially, Richard Allen of New York University for his scrupulous chapter-by-chapter evaluation of the text and its historical method. I also want to thank Bill Lafferty of Wright State University and Hap Kindem of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill respectively for urging my consideration of "race movies" and Yiddish cinema as alternative modes of film practice ; Sandy Flitterman-Lewis of Rutgers University for clarification of Germaine Dulac's crucial role in the development of French avant-garde impressionism; Hillel Tryster of The Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Steven Spielberg Jewish Film Archive for detailed information about Israeli cinema and early filmmaking in Palestine; and Forrest Ciesol of International Cinema Concepts, San Diego, for sharing with me his vast knowledge of Central Asian cinema, as well as for enabling me and my students to see key films from the region in beautiful 35mm prints. Similarly, I must thank the filmmakers from former Soviet Georgia— the directors Aleko Tsabadze and Gogi Chkonia, and the actress Nato Shengelaia—and from Norway—the directors Bente Erichsen, Ola Solum, and Lasse Glomm—who visited my classes with their work over the past few years, offering valuable insights into their unique national cinemas. Much of my research on the cinema of the former Soviet republics was funded by a 1991 Hewlett Visiting Fellowship in the Carter Center's International Media and Communications Program directed by Dr. Ellen Mickiewicz, currently director of the DeWitt Wallace Center for Communications and Journalism at Duke University. Special thanks are due to David Pratt and James Steffen, doctoral candidates in Emory's Film Studies Program who have worked tirelessly as my research assistants to prepare the new Selective Bibliography for this edition, and to Adrienne McLean, Ph. D., of the Film Studies Program for her help in preparing the Instructor's Manual. Finally, I want to thank my editor, Peter Simon at W. W. Norton & Company, whose skilled and expeditious collaboration on this project has made working on it a true delight. The publisher, in turn, gratefully acknowledges the valuable help of Nancy Palmquist, Margaret Farley, Diane O'Connor, Marian Johnson, David Sutter, Tara Parmiter, Ben Gamit, Regina Dahlgren-Ardini and Ann Tappert.

-xxi-

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