Glossary

Academy aperture The frame size established by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to standardize the sound film in 1932. It indicates an aspect ratio of 4:3, or 1.33:1. See widescreen.

acceleratedmontage A sequence made up of shots of increasingly shorter lengths that creates a psychological atmosphere of excitement and tension. See mon- tage ; parallel action.

accelerated motion See fast motion.

aerial shot A shot from above, usually made from a plane, helicopter, or crane. See crane shot.

"agit-Guignol" Eisenstein's term for agitational effects involving shocking vio- lence; derived from the Grand Guignol, a theater in Paris (1897-1962) that specialized in realistic depiction of murder and torture.

anamorphic lens A lens that squeezes a wide image to fit the dimensions of a stan- dard 35mm film frame. In projection, an anamorphic lens on the projector reverses the process and redistributes the wide image on the screen. See wide- screen.

animation All techniques that make inanimate objects move on the screen, such as drawing directly on the film, individually photographing animation cells, and photographing the objects one frame at a time while adjusting their position between frames. See pixillation; stop-motion photography.

arc light The source of high-energy illumination on the movie set and in the projec- tor ; the principle source of film lighting during the twenties and for three- strip Technicolor. It is produced by an electric current that arcs across the gap between two pieces of carbon (the direct current carbon arc), or, more recently, by a mercury arc between tungsten electrodes sealed in a glass bulb (the alternating current arc or HMI—"Hydrargyum Medium Arc-Length Iodide"—globe).

Arriflex A light, portable camera first used in the late fifties; it was essential to the mobile, hand-held photography of the New Wave and to most contemporary cinematography. Mitchell cameras, however, are the industry's workhorses.

art director The person responsible for set design and graphics.

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