The Performance of Nobility in Early Modern European Literature

By David M. Posner | Go to book overview

Cambridge Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture
General editorSTEPHEN ORGEL Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Humanities, Stanford UniversityEditorial board Anne Barton, University of Cambridge Jonathan Dollimore, University of York Marjorie Garber, Harvard University Jonathan Goldberg, Johns Hopkins University Nancy Vickers, Bryn Mawr CollegeSince the 1970s there has been a broad and vital reinterpretation of the nature of literary texts, a move away from formalism to a sense of literature as an aspect of social, economic, political and cultural history. While the earliest New Historicist work was criticized for a narrow and anecdotal view of history, it also served as an important stimulus for post-structuralist, feminist, Marxist and psychoanalytical work, which in turn has increasingly informed and redirected it. Recent writing on the nature of representation, the historical construction of gender and of the concept of identity itself, on theatre as a political and economic phenomenon and on the ideologies of art generally, reveals the breadth of the field. Cambridge Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture is designed to offer historically oriented studies of Renaissance literature and theatre which make use of the insights afforded by theoretical perspectives. The view of history envisioned is above all a view of our own history, a reading of the Renaissance for and from our own time.Recent titles include
28. Eve Rachele Sanders, Gender and literacy on stage in early modern England
29. Dorothy Stephens, The limits of eroticism in postPetrarchan narrative: conditional pleasure from Spenser to Marvell
30. Celia R. Daileader, Eroticism on the Renaissance stage: transcendence, desire, and the limits of the visible
31. Theodore B. Leinwand, Theatre, finance and society in early modern England
32. Heather Dubrow, Shakespeare and domestic loss: forms of deprivation, mourning, and recuperation

A complete list of books in the series is given at the end of the volume

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