Mahan: The Life and Work of Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan, U.S.N.

By W. D. Puleston | Go to book overview

Chapter XIV Search for a Publisher

AT the close of the college session in 1886, when he realized that his hearers considered his treatment of naval history "interesting as well as novel," Mahan conceived the idea of publishing his lectures. A year later he wrote Ashe: "My own lectures of that last session met with a degree of success which surprised me and which still seems exaggerated. All the same, of course, it was pleasant and if it leads to a book, as I sometimes think, you may yourself have an opportunity of passing judgment." Mrs. Mahan, of course, had long been convinced that her husband could write, and wanted the lectures published. Admiral Luce, too, believed they would appeal to that part of the general public interested in the problems of government, as well as to naval officers, and that their publication would help the War College in its struggle for existence. He added his influence to Mrs. Mahan's. Mahan had seen his father and uncle develop their lectures into books; now he was ready to follow their example. With all his diffidence, he considered himself "naturally a teacher" and desired to enlarge his audience.

Early in 1888 Luce tried to interest a well-known New York firm in the undertaking, but he failed. Mahan offered it to other companies, which all declined. While he was on duty in Puget Sound, his friends continued their efforts, but when he returned to Newport in the summer of 1889 the manuscript was still unprinted. The estimated cost was two thousand dollars. No publisher was willing to take the risk. One firm offered to publish at Mahan's risk, but he could not afford to furnish the guarantee. In desperation he wrote to two wealthy men and offered to present them

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mahan: The Life and Work of Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan, U.S.N.
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 386

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.