Facing Black and Jew: Literature as Public Space in Twentieth-Century America

By Adam Zachary Newton | Go to book overview

Notes

Preface
1
Lest my use of “discursive” seem inapt, one has only to consider the journal commonQuest: The Magazine of Black Jewish Relations, which is fully committed not only to Black/Jewish solidarity, but to a magazination of it in as many ways as possible: politics, religion, humor, personal anecdote, and so on. Happily, this magazine is not wholly premised on crisis or nostalgia, suggesting that the critical practice of facing and Black Jewish relations as discourse may at a certain point intersect.
2
Alain Finkielkraut, The Wisdom of Love, trans. Kevin O'Neill and David Suchoff (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1997), 19. Finkielkraut continues, “Considerable progress has been made from the scorn or fear of blacks [for example, ] to the formula 'Black is beautiful': but in both cases, the countenance remains chained to its manifestations, sentenced to the uninterrupted expression of an unequivocal message. Idolatry perpetuates slander. ” The same argument applies to Jewish triumphalism, needless to say.
3
Wishing to do justice to the ethical courage of Levinas's entire work itself as a composite and answerable whole I have confined any rapprochement between Levinasian and literary analysis to a discrete and limited thematic application, much as I did in my Narrative Ethics (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1995). While not a “reading” of Levinas's philosophy in any sense, both the present book and its precursor remain faithful to his liturgical sense of a text as lying in the hands of answerable readers. For a short but excellent treatment of the relation between Levinas's philosophy and his scriptural hermeneutics, see Jacob Meskin, Critique, Tradition, and the Religious Imagination: An Esssay on Levinas' Talmudic Readings, ” in Judaism (Winter, 98), 91–106, also the introduction to Nine Talmudic Readings by Emmanuel Levinas, trans. Annette Aronowicz (Bloomington: University of Indiana Press, 1990). Finally, Robert Eaglestone's Ethical Criticism: Reading After Levinas (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1998) picks up where my own book leaves off, with particular attention to the 169

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Facing Black and Jew: Literature as Public Space in Twentieth-Century America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 218

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.