Mahan: The Life and Work of Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan, U.S.N.

By W. D. Puleston | Go to book overview

Chapter XXXV The Russo-Japanese War

ON February 6, 1904, Japan severed diplomatic relations with Russia. Two days later, Japanese destroyers made a surprise attack on the unguarded Port Arthur Squadron lying in the outer roads. Thus began the fourth and largest war since the appearance of The Influence of Sea Power upon History, a war that further substantiated the thesis of sea power and its principal corollaries.

Upon the outbreak of hostilities the editor of Collier's Weekly offered Mahan a "handsome sum" for three articles on the war. Mrs. Mahan had been ill during the winter, and Mahan himself was in need of change and rest after an arduous year of writing. He had arranged to take the family to Europe early in the spring. But he felt he could not afford to refuse. So he postponed sailing until May 10 and undertook the additional work. Fortunately the Scribner's articles on the War of 1812 were almost finished, the book itself was not scheduled to be published until October, 1905, and he was free for the task.

The first article was written within a week of the opening Japanese attack. At that time Mahan knew exactly the number and types of the belligerent naval vessels in the war zone, the strength of Russia's Baltic and Black Sea squadrons, where to look for information of the opposing armies, and the carrying capacities of the railways serving the land forces. He had studied the strategic features of the theater of operations in preparing an article on the Sino-Japanese War and was fairly well informed about the strength of Port Arthur. This knowledge and experience enabled him to estimate with considerable accuracy the relative military strength of the two nations as the combat

-249-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mahan: The Life and Work of Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan, U.S.N.
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 386

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.