Mahan: The Life and Work of Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan, U.S.N.

By W. D. Puleston | Go to book overview

Chapter XXXVII The Second Hague Conference

IN 1905 Captain and Mrs. Mahan decided to spend their winters in a warmer climate. They rented their city house for five years and toward the end of October took the family to Europe. The first stop was Gibraltar. From there they went by way of Algeciras, Granada, Cordoba, and Madrid to Pau for a Christmas visit with Mrs. Mahan's sister.

During January, 1906, Mahan began his memoirs for Harper and Brothers. He also wrote Maxse that he was ready to undertake the article on the lessons of the Russo- Japanese War, and requested any recent data. He was more disposed to the undertaking for he had "one or two suggestions on questions of naval policy" that he wanted to work in. As the war was "so much in the past," he could be deliberate in preparation. Both Professor Thursfield and Professor Laughton generously furnished material; and the article was published in May. It was printed with substantial additions in 1908 in Naval Administration and Warfare.

From the general tenor of the article it was apparent that Mahan felt the latest war had not revolutionized or even seriously modified "antecedent teachings of military and naval history." He closed with his usual lesson to his own Navy, this time warning it of the dangers of dividing the fleet. Citing the similarity between the problem that confronted the Russian Navy in 1903, and the one that will always confront the United States with its two widely separated seaboards, he concluded: "Concentration protects both coasts, Division exposes both. If is of vital consequence to the nation of the United States, that its people,

-267-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mahan: The Life and Work of Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan, U.S.N.
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 386

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.