Mahan: The Life and Work of Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan, U.S.N.

By W. D. Puleston | Go to book overview

Chapter XLV The World War

IN the summer of 1913 Dr. Jameson, who had been associated with Mahan in the American Historical Association for a dozen years and at the time was head of the Department of Historical Research at the Carnegie Institution in Washington, invited Mahan to become for "one winter of five or six months a Research Associate" of the institution. This position would require a residence in Washington, during which Mahan could do research work on the subjects he desired. His contribution to the institution would be "in inspiring the Staff" with new ideas and fresh points of view. Dr. Jameson thought he and his department would benefit by the temporary association "with a mind which, in the field of historical thought, works as yours does," and he suggested the winter of either 1913-1914 or 1914-15.

Mahan was reluctant to spend a winter in Washington, but he promised to "keep the matter in mind." "Being seventy-three this month," he explained, "I calculate our family movements more from the point of view of my daughters than of myself or wife. We were abroad all last winter, and I am not willing another [winter] should separate them from their outside friends and relatives upon which much of their lives must depend in the future." While noncommittal, he held out hope that he might be willing to come for the winter of 1914.

During 1913 Mahan published only two articles. He felt an increasing distaste for working at a desk. He was at his best at Quogue where he "bathed in the sea all the summer'' and enjoyed both the surf and the swimming. That summer he had one narrow escape while swimming in a heavy sea with a strong undertow. He had to signal for the

-337-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mahan: The Life and Work of Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan, U.S.N.
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 386

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.