Deeply into the Bone: Re-Inventing Rites of Passage

By Ronald L. Grimes | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
More on the topic of ritual invention can be found in Grimes, “Reinventing Ritual. ”
2
It is unnecessarily confusing to speak of every passage, birth and divorce, for instance, as a rite of passage, as does Ambert in Divorce in Canada, 130.
3
By soul I mean the self at its very root, the self in its most complete sense.
4
The distinction between transformation and transportation is made by Schechner, Essays in Performance Theory.
5
See, for example, Humphrey and Laidlaw, Archetypal Actions of Ritual, 95–100.
6
Two other scholars construct a story-ritual connection similar to the one I am presenting here; see Anderson and Foley, Mighty Stories, Dangerous Rituals.
7
An example of ritualizing on the plumber's model is that of Welfare State International. See Coult and Kershaw, Engineers of the Imagination.
8
An example of ritualizing on the mystical model is that of Jerzy Grotowski. See Wolford and Schechner, The Grotowski Sourcebook.
9
Rappaport, Ecology, Meaning, and Religion; d'Aquili and Laughlin, “Neurobiology of Myth and Ritual. ”
10
Eykamp, “Born and Born Again, ” 58. The phrase she quotes is from Fischer, “Ritual as Communication, ” 176.
11
See Klassen, “Blessed Events. ”
12
Davis-Floyd, Birth as an American Rite of Passage, 229–34.
13
See Wall, Callisto Myth.
14
As early as 1988, Karen and Jeffery Paige, using Jack Goody's definition of ritual, were claiming that delivery practices are ritual, but they did not develop or illustrate the argument. See Majumdar, Age of Imperial Unity, 268.
15
Davis-Floyd, Birth as an American Rite of Passage, 40.
16
Carolina Echeverria, Montreal, Canada, personal communication.
17
Laderman, Wives and Midwives, 173.
18
Davis-Floyd and Sargent, Childbirth and Authoritative Knowledge, 11. At the turn of the century the hospital birth rate was only 5 percent; by World War II, 50 percent; see Paige and Paige, Politics of Reproductive Ritual, 268.
19
Davis-Floyd, Birth as an American Rite of Passage, 8.
20
For more on my view of ritual in hospital settings see Grimes, “Illness, Embodiment. ”
21
Miner, “Body Ritual, ” 10–11.
22
Part of the following discussion draws on Grimes, Ritual Criticism, 9 ff.

-347-

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Deeply into the Bone: Re-Inventing Rites of Passage
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction - Rough Passages, Reinvented Rites 1
  • Chapter 1 - Celebrating New Life, Ritually Nurturing the Young 15
  • Chapter 2 - Coming of Age, Joining Up 87
  • Chapter 3 - Divining Mates, Making Kin 151
  • Chapter 4 - Living with the Dead, Exiting Gracefully 217
  • Chapter 5 - Passages, Troubled and Uncharted 285
  • Conclusion - Beyond Passage 335
  • Notes 347
  • Sources Cited 359
  • Index 369
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