The Catholic Revolution: New Wine, Old Wineskins, and the Second Vatican Council

By Andrew Greeley | Go to book overview

ELEVEN
Recovering the Catholic
Heritage

The Catholic analogical imagination is … fragile—it could be lost if it is not cultivated in successor generations.

Terrence Tilley

In the remaining chapters of this essay, I turn away from analysis to discuss the implications for the Church of that analysis. 1 I stand by the integrity of my data and the soundness of my analysis. My policy reflections go beyond my analysis but seem to me to flow from it.

John Shea has written somewhere that it is the Catholic genius to search in the trash cans and the junkyards of history for forgotten symbols that might still have value. Thus if one tries to recover some of the potentially useful and valuable symbols of the heritage, one must explore the images and stories and metaphors, the art and beauty of the Catholic past. 2

Catholics are different, not completely different, but still

-131-

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The Catholic Revolution: New Wine, Old Wineskins, and the Second Vatican Council
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents ix
  • Tables xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Old Wineskins 5
  • One - A Catholic Revolution 7
  • Two - The “confident” Church 17
  • Three - The Wineskins Burst 34
  • Four - What Happened? 41
  • Five - Effervescence Spreads from the Council to the World 61
  • Six - How Do They Stay? 71
  • Seven - New Rules, New Prophets, and Beige Catholicism 81
  • Eight - Only in America? 90
  • Nine - Why They Stay 99
  • Ten - Priests 120
  • Part II - The Search for New Wineskins 129
  • Eleven - Recovering the Catholic Heritage 131
  • Twelve - Religious Education and Beauty 150
  • Thirteen - Authority as Charm 168
  • Fourteen - Liturgists and the Laity 179
  • Conclusion 191
  • Notes 197
  • References 207
  • Index 211
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