Atonement and Forgiveness: A New Model for Black Reparations

By Roy L. Brooks | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE

My nation's journey toward justice has not been easy and it is not over. The racial bigotry fed by slavery did not end with slavery or with segregation, and many of the issues that still trouble America have roots in that bitter experience of other times.

President George Walker Bush (June 2003)

With these words, spoken at the site of the infamous Goree Island in Dakar, Senegal, which served as a point of departure for the millions of Africans sent through the middle passage to America, President Bush came closer than any other American president to tendering an apology for slavery. We are, indeed, moving closer to the day when such an apology and reparations will become a reality. I would hope that President Bush would be the first president to initiate the atonement process. Not only does he have political pedigree as head of the party of Lincoln to move in this direction, but he also has an understanding of the need and power of redemption, which he gets through his deep religious faith.

Yet the president's statement at Goree Island stops short of the apology that is needed to begin the process of atonement and racial reconciliation for which I have argued in this book. Thus the question Susan Sontag poses in Regarding the Pain of Others,1 still rings true: “[W]hy is there not already, in the nation's capital, which happens to be a city whose population is overwhelmingly African-American, a Museum of the History of Slavery?” After noting that the existing “Holocaust Memorial Museum and the future Armenian Genocide Museum and Memorial are about what didn't happen in America, ” Sontag answers her own question: “To have a museum chronicling the great crime that was African slavery in the United States of America would be to acknowledge that the evil was here. Americans prefer to pic-

-207-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Atonement and Forgiveness: A New Model for Black Reparations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter 1 - The Purpose and History of the Black Redress Movement 1
  • Chapter 2 - Harms to Slaves and Free Blacks 20
  • Chapter 3 - Harms to Descendants 36
  • Chapter 4 - The Tort Model 98
  • Chapter 5 - The Atonement Model 141
  • Chapter 6 - Opposing Arguments 180
  • Epilogue 207
  • Appendix 1 - Selected List of Other Atrocities 213
  • Appendix 2 - Summary of the Negotiations That Led to Germany's Foundation Law 218
  • Notes 221
  • Selected Bibliography 273
  • Cases 299
  • Statutes 303
  • Index 307
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved in your active project from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 325

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.