Economic Planning and the Tariff: An Essay on Social Philosophy

By James Gerald Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
TWENTIETH CENTURY ECONOMIC PLANNING

NOT long ago, to advocate economic planning meant something definite, even if it was utopian. Economic planning connotated socialism or communism. While there may be no logical sense in permitting the socialists and communists to have a monopoly on the term, or the idea, still there was some advantage in knowing clearly the political complexion of anyone who permitted himself to use these words with approval. More recently, the argumentative advantages inherent in the very idea of "planning" has been recognized in this propagandist age by the wily capitalists. In fascist countries the capitalists are stealing the thunder of the critical liberal and socialistic or communistic groups by developing an economic planning of their own. Then too, we find a liberal Democratic party in power in the United States with a slogan advocating economic planning; and finally (shades of Alexander Hamilton!) some formerly regarded staunch Republicans have indicated approval of economic planning.


SIGNIFICANT CHANGE IN MEANING OF "ECONOMIC PLANNING"

What is the meaning of this change? As things were in the beginning this term was anathema to practical men of all political flavors excepting only the extreme lefts; and now we have everybody, or nearly everybody, vigorously favoring it. Can it be that we have really attained psychologically that utopian condition of socialism which has been so feared by some? This would be a sanguine view! What has really happened, on the contrary, is that it has been taken up as a fad; and it has come to a point where no one really knows what exactly he is favoring, or what really is meant by economic planning. Each group has a "plan" and that is what he advocates, and is struggling to have put into effect. But that was true in the old era of rugged individualism! We are all one hundred per cent in favor of economic planning when we do the planning.

It may help to clarify our ideas if we contemplate the various meanings which seem to be intermixed in the New Deal and new

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic Planning and the Tariff: An Essay on Social Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.