The Saga of Anthropology in China: From Malinowski to Moscow to Mao

By Gregory Eliyu Guldin | Go to book overview

Postscript

One year to the day of Professor Liang's death, the Anthropology Department of Zhongshan University held a ceremony to announce the establishment of a memorial fund in honor of the professor. Each year four scholarships of 200 yuan each will be awarded to deserving students. Mrs. Liang herself endowed the fund by donating the 10,000-yuan award the university gave her upon her husband's death. "Let the students use the money," she told me later, "to carry on anthropology in China."

Then, in May 1991, the department commemorated its birth a decade earlier. At the festivities the forthcoming publication of a volume dedicated to Professor Liang's memory was announced. Published in November 1991, Liang Zhaotao yu Renleixue (Liang Zhaotao and Anthropology) is the joint effort of those who knew him—from his mentor Yang Chengzhi, to his colleagues Wu Rukang, Zhuang Yiqun, Chen Ziquan, Huang Shuping, Huang Xinmei, Song Changdong, Zeng Qi, Gu Dingguo, and Gong Peihua, to his students Zeng Zhaoxuan, Rong Guanqiong, Zhang Shouqi, Chen Qixin, Yang Heshu, Gelek, Qiao Xiaoqin, Chen Hua, Li Xiaoguo, Li Anmin, Ma Guoqing, and Mai Yinhao.

As for Mrs. Liang, soon after her husband's passing she began to yield to her son Liang Jim's entreaties to join him in Atlanta. On May 2, 1990, she donated all of Liang Zhaotao's books to the university library and began to make plans to join her son in the United States during 1992. Before she left China, however, she visited Beijing for the first time—a journey that she had desired for so long to make with her husband.

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