Stages and Pathways of Drug Involvement: Examining the Gateway Hypothesis

By Denise B. Kandel | Go to book overview

Each participant was asked to consider three broad issues: the nature of the pathways into drug abuse, the risk and protective factors that predict progression along the pathways, and the policy implications of the Gateway Hypothesis. Within these three areas, specific questions were highlighted. These are presented in Chapter 1.

Richard Jessor, Director of the Institute of Behavioral Science of the University of Colorado at Boulder, invited me to organize the conference. The conference was sponsored by the Youth Enhancement Service, a division of the Brain Information Service of the University of California at Los Angeles, directed by Michael Chase. Richard Jessor and Michael Chase were closely involved in planning the conference. Their contributions helped make it a successful forum for a stimulating and critical interchange of ideas. Michael Chase and his staff, especially Jena Miller, provided exceptional administrative support and contributed immeasurably to the success of the meeting. Funding for the conference was provided to the Youth Enhancement Service by the Anheuser-Busch Foundation, whose support is greatly appreciated. My work on this volume was supported by a Research Scientist Award (K05 DA00081) from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, for which I am most appreciative. I am particularly grateful for the contributions of the participants, which form the body of this volume.

Many of the ideas developed in the concluding chapter incorporate issues and points raised by the participants at the conference and in the chapters of this volume. Many ideas derive from my long-standing collaboration with Kazuo Yamaguchi on the study of stages of drug involvement. Many issues were clarified by the conference. But many remain unresolved and much remains to be done.

-xvi-

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