Submitting to Freedom: The Religious Vision of William James

By Bennett Ramsey | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

As this is a book about the relationships that obtain and are primary in our individual efforts, it is appropriate to preface what is about to be said by acknowledging at least some of those who influenced this book's writing. First and foremost, I would like to acknowledge Tom Driver, through whose wisdom this book gained whatever insight it might contain about the drama of human relations. Acknowledgment goes out as well to my initial set of readers, James Washington, Wayne Proudfoot, Cornel West, and Gerald Sheppard, who provided constructive, critical insight into William James and my attempts to understand him and, in the case of West, Washington, and Sheppard, dogged me about the book until I submitted and sent it out for publication. Sally MacNichol, Richard Werner, and John Sopper served as primary conversation partners during the period in which I revised my work. I thank them for their insights and endurance; their thoughts and concerns lie at the heart of my own thoughts about James. A special word of acknowledgment is owed to Henry Levinson, whose knowledge about James gave the critical stimulus to my thinking, and whose support for and affirmation of my redescription of James helped to bring this book to life. Finally, I am deeply thankful to Lisa Huestis, whose conviction and encouragement brought me across those gaps where the courage of my convictions failed.

April 1992
Decatur, Georgia

B. R.

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Submitting to Freedom: The Religious Vision of William James
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Submitting to Freedom - The Religious Vision of William James *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Contents *
  • Submitting to Freedom *
  • Introduction 3
  • I - The Early Years: 1865-1890 *
  • 1 - A Presence of Absence 17
  • 2 - Reweaving the Self 33
  • II - The Later Years: 1890-1910 *
  • 3 - The Romance of Self-Assertion 59
  • 4 - The Self Resubmitted 77
  • 5 - Returning to Experience 103
  • Conclusion 129
  • Notes 145
  • Index 173
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