Economic Change and the National Question in Twentieth-Century Europe

By Alice Teichova; Herbert Matis et al. | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
In 1829, the boundary of the mainland was laid down and the islands adjoining Peloponnesos, Euboea, the Cyclades and the Northern Sporades also became part of the Greek kingdom by the Protocol of 22 March and the Treaty of 21 July 1832 between the three Protecting Powers (England, France and Russia) and Turkey. In 1863 the Ionian Islands were ceded by Britain to Greece, while as a result of the Treaty of Berlin in 1878 the frontiers were changed and in 1881 Thessaly and the district of Arta were added to Greek territory. Finally, after the Balkan wars in 1912–13 and victory, Greece acquired Macedonia and Thrace, as well as the islands of the northern Aegean, and the frontiers with Bulgaria and Serbia were fixed. Turkey finally renounced its claims to the island of Crete in 1913. Crete had taken part in the war of independence and several uprisings occurred on the island. Two years after the last Cretan insurrection of 1896, Crete became autonomous, maintaining this status until 1906; subsequently, union with Greece was proclaimed (see map, figure 10.1).
2
An expression used by E. Venizelos after the conclusion of the Treaty of Sèvres.
3
The last phase of territorial expansion occurred in 1948 when the Dodecanese Islands — under Italian occupation — were finally ceded to Greece.
4
Whereas the literature on nationalism in general is extensive, there are relatively few works on economic nationalism. Moreover, they usually focus on recent third world development policies. A. Kahan's analysis is a welcome exception. See A. Kahan, 'Nineteenth-century European experience with policies of economic nationalism' in H. G. Johnson (ed.), Economic Nationalism in Old and New States (London, 1968), pp. 17–30.
5
Albanians in fact had fought in the war of independence as Greeks and became citizens of the new nation. The frequent occurrence of Italian proper names and the Catholic faith in the Cyclades Islands indicating descent from noble Genoese or Venetian families cannot be used as evidence of foreign influence, since these populations were, as a rule, of Greek extraction. See Peace Handbooks, Vol. III, Part I, 'Greece with the Cyclades and Northern Sporades', No. 18 (London, 1920), p. 14.
6
Peace Handbooks, Vol. IV, Part II, 'The Balkan States', No. 21 (London, 1920), pp. 14, 80 and 91.
7
For a detached and detailed contemporary presentation of the ethnic groups in Macedonia, A. A. Pallis, 'Racial migrations in the Balkans during the years 1912–1924', The Geographical Journal 66 (1925), 315–31.
8
The recent rekindling of the issue in the area lies beyond the scope of this chapter.
9
'Ethnicity' is a problematic term too, as different criteria of classification have been used over time. Within the Ottoman Empire, for instance, under the millet system, religion — and not language or national sentiment — was the determining factor. Once independent nations were created, or national

-221-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic Change and the National Question in Twentieth-Century Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 433

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.