Economic Change and the National Question in Twentieth-Century Europe

By Alice Teichova; Herbert Matis et al. | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
Regional Disparities and Developments in the Republics of Yugoslavia, (Paris, March 1992, unpublished).
2
Similar attempts were made by Slovenian economist Franjo Štiblar in 'The rise and fall of Yugoslavia: an economic history view' in Alice Teichova (ed.), Central Europe in the Twentieth Century: An Economic History Perspective (Aldershot; 1997), pp. 61–82 and Serbian economist Milica Uvalić in 'The disintegration of Yugoslavia: its costs and benefits', Communist Economies & Economic Transformation 5 (1993), 273–93.
3
Zgodovina narodov Jugoslavije, Prva in druga knjiga[A history of Yugoslav nations, Books 1 and 2], (Ljubljana, 1953 and 1959).
4
Patrick Bolton, Gerard Roland and Enrico Spolaore, 'Economic theories of the break-up and integration of nations', European Economic Review 49 (1996), 697–705.
5
In Charles Jelavich, South Slav Nationalism Textbook and Yugoslav Union before 1914 (Columbus, OH, 1990) one can find a detailed discussion about the role of educational process in the development and preservation of national identity.
6
Enciklopedija Jugoslavije, 2. izdaja, četrta knjiga [Encyclopedia of Yugoslavia, 2nd edn, vol. IV], (Zagreb, 1989 — Slovenian edition), p. 312. The second edition of Enciklopedija Jugoslavije [Encyclopedia of Yugoslavia] remained an unfinished project.
7
The main idea of Illyrianism — to create a common culture for all South—Slavs on the basis of a unique literary language — was rejected by those nations. From 1848 the terms Yugoslav and Croatian replaced Illyrian to designate the national movement. The role of Slav nationalism and Yugoslavism in the 1860s in Croatia is explained in Mirjana Gross, 'The union of Dalmatia with northern Croatia: a crucial question of the Croatian national integration in the nineteenth century' in Mikuláš Teich and Roy Porter (eds.), The National Question in Europe in Historical Context (Cambridge, 1993), pp. 270–92.
8
Enciklopedija Jugoslavije, šesta knjiga [Encyclopedia of Yugoslavia, vol. VI], (Zagreb, — Croat or Serbian edition, in Latinic transcription), p. 133.
9
Janko Pleterski, Narodi, revolucija, Jugoslavija [Nations, revolution, Yugoslavia], (Ljubljana, 1986); Branko Petranović, Istorija Jugoslavije 1918–1978 [A history of Yugoslavia, 1918–1978], (Beograd, 1980).
10
Rudolf Bičanić, Ekonomska podloga hrvatskog pitanja [Economic basis of the Croatian question] (Zagreb, 1938).
11
Andrej Gosar, Banovina Slovenija. Politična, finančna in gospodarska vprašanja [Ban's Country of Slovenia. Political, financial and economic issues], (Ljubljana, 1940).
12
Istina o Ekonomskoj podlozi hrvatskog pitanja — Odgovor g. dr. Bičaniću [The truth about the economic basis of the Croatian question — Answers to Dr Bičanić], (Beograd, 1940). The authors were Gojko Grđić, Vladimir Ðorđević, Jovan Lovčević, Milan J. Ž ujović, Bogdan Prica and Slobodan M. Drašković.

-335-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic Change and the National Question in Twentieth-Century Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 433

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.