The Political Economy of International Trade Law: Essays in Honor of Robert E. Hudec

By Daniel L. M. Kennedy; James D. Southwick | Go to book overview

PREFACE
D. L. M. K.
J. D. S.

This volume represents the collaboration of thirty-eight authorities in the field of international trade who were willing to take part in a creative endeavor. Together, these attorneys, economists, and political scientists adopted a common viewpoint to examine different trade-related issues. That viewpoint is summed up in this book's title as one of political economy, and described in detail in the book's introduction.

The endeavor is a tribute to the contributions of Robert E. Hudec on the occasion of his retirement from the University of Minnesota Law School. For decades, Bob Hudec has explored problems of international trade, blending the legal, political, and economic factors at play into comprehensible explanations of the actions of nations. With clarity and wit, he has shared his insights with others in the numerous works listed in the bibliography at the end of the book. It is a fitting tribute thatothersshouldadoptthesamemethodologyintheirexaminationsof thetimely trade issues addressed in this book.

Even before beginning his career in international trade law, Professor Hudec had distinguished himself: Rhodes Scholar, magna cum laude graduate of Yale University Law School, editor-in-chief of the Yale Law Journal, and law clerk to Justice Potter Stewart of the United States Supreme Court. It is no surprise that he has gone on to gain international respect for his research and writing, and has been selected repeatedly to serve on GATT/WTO and NAFTA dispute settlement panels. We believe that the quality of Bob Hudec's work is reflected in the outstanding contributions in this volume, and we hope that readers derive not only an appreciation of the authors and the insightful analyses they offer, but also an understanding of Professor Hudec.

Each of the essays in this volume was first prepared for a conference honoring Professor Hudec's retirement in September 2000. That conference offered participants an opportunity to obtain feedback and refine their drafts before publication. Sponsored by the University of Minnesota Law School and supported financially by Cargill, Inc. and the law firm of Dorsey & Whitney LLP, the conference provided a helpful springboard for this book.

Any publication is the work of many people, and this is no exception. Dean E. Thomas Sullivan of the University of Minnesota Law School has supported this effort generously from the start, and Amy Stine has provided extensive

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