William Jennings Bryan - Vol. 1

By Paolo E. Coletta | Go to book overview

for seeing things through. First he must obtain an education, a more powerful tool than land or slaves. Then someday he might become a country squire and possess a mansion and a deer park, as did some of the planters of Virginia. He believed that the common individual had the unquestioned right to the completest equality of opportunity to make the most of his abilities. Believing so, there was no reason why he could not perhaps become a member of Congress.

For the next decade Silas toiled unremittingly to obtain the power which is knowledge. He attended various schools until he settled down at McKendree College, a Methodist institution in Lebanon, Illinois. By working as a farm hand and woodchopper he supported himself until graduation, in 1849, at the advanced age of twenty-seven, then persisted until he won a master's degree. For the next two years he taught in the Walnut Hill school, a dozen miles from Salem, and for two years he was elected county superintendent of schools. Meantime he had been studying law, and at the age of twenty-nine he was admitted to the bar and began practice in Salem. The next year, 1852, on his thirtieth birthday, he married Mariah Elizabeth Jennings. The house he built for her, the birthplace of William Jennings Bryan, is now maintained by the city of Salem as a museum.

The roots of the Jennings family can be traced to thirteenth-century England. They intermingle with the Brewsters, who crossed on the Mayflower, and with the progenitors of Charles Gates Dawes. There was a John Jennings in America as early as 1659, but the first Jennings about whom much is known is Israel Jennings, born about 1784. He married Mary Waters and in 1819 moved from Maysville, Kentucky, to a farm two miles west of Walnut Hill, Illinois. The third of their eight children, Charles Wayland Jennings, in 1826 married Maria Wood Davidson, of Scottish descent. The fourth of their ten children was named Mariah Elizabeth. By the time of her birth, Israel Jennings had amassed land in Marion County and had served several terms in the General Assembly. It was possibly with his aid that Silas Bryan won election to the state senate soon after he married Mariah. 1

____________________
1
The family trees of the Bryan and Jennings families are traced from the Bryan Family Bible and the manuscript, "Bryan Genealogy," in the Mrs. Thomas Stinson Allen Papers; William Jennings Bryan and Mary Baird Bryan, The Memoirs of William Jennings Bryan, pp. 18-21; W. A. Crozier (ed.), Virginia County Records, I, 12, 18, 85; Mary J. Seymour, Lineage Book. National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, VII, 263; XII, 341; XIX, 1; XXI, 321; Charles W. Bryan, Jr., "Morgan Bryan, Pioneer on the Opequon and Yadkin," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 70 (April 1962), 154-164.

-2-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
William Jennings Bryan - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 486

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.