William Jennings Bryan - Vol. 1

By Paolo E. Coletta | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3

Love and the Law

I

IN THE fall of 1879, when he was nineteen years old, Bryan entered his junior year at Illinois College and Mary Elizabeth Baird, aged eighteen years, enrolled at the Jacksonville Female Academy. It was at an "open house" at the "Jail for Angels," as the academy was called, that Bryan first saw Mary. Her features were clear-cut but gently molded into an oval-shaped face. She had full, curved lips, large gray‐ brown eyes, curly brown hair, lightness of movement, and a ready laugh, but a searching expression revealed that there was an intellect behind her attractive appearance.

Mary's charm proved irresistible to Bryan, but she was not immediately taken with him. He was tall enough, but his face was pale and thin; his brows were heavy, his nose too prominent, and his hair was parted "distressingly straight." On the other hand, his dark eyes were keen, his hair fine in quality, and his thin-lipped mouth and square-cut chin revealed determination. He was neat but not fastidious, carried himself with dignity, and had an expansive and expressive smile. 1

Bryan's resourcefulness in circumventing academy regulations for callers proved prodigious. When Mary's mother stayed at a local sanitarium during the winter of 1879-1880, he called upon her at the same time that Mary did. In violation of rules, he took Mary for rides in a buggy he rented. Then, after Mrs. Baird returned to her home, he induced the wife of the president of the college to invite Mary to her home for an evening, when he too would call. Several other women fell in with similar requests, with the result that the courtship flourished amidst a merry conspiracy. 2

____________________
1
William Jennings Bryan and Mary Baird Bryan, The Mernoiss of William Jennings Bryan, p. 222.
2
Interviews with Miss Carrie Dunlap and Mrs. Julian S. Wadsworth, Jackson‐ vine, June 28, 1947; Bryan to Mary Baird, March 9, 27, May 2, 4, 12, 1880 and Mary Baird to Bryan, May 11, 1880, Mrs. Ruth Bryan Rohde Papers.

-21-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
William Jennings Bryan - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 486

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.