William Jennings Bryan - Vol. 1

By Paolo E. Coletta | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5

Congressman: Tariff Reform and
the Income Tax

I

BRYAN arrived in Washington, D. C., in late November 1891. When he finally found an apartment, early in 1892, he was joined by Mrs. Bryan and the now three children, Grace Dexter having been born on February 17, 1891. Since there were no House or Senate office buildings as yet, he used a room in his apartment as an office. Instead of hiring just one secretary he spread his clerk-hire among "deserving Democrats," that is, he brought a number of young Nebraskans to Washington for periods of from four to six weeks.

Bryan was uninterested in the polite and literary society of the capital, then dominated by Henry Adams, Whitelaw Reid, William C. Whitney, Don Cameron, and Theodore Roosevelt, then Civil Service Commissioner; and Mrs. Bryan declined invitations to join the Congressional Women's Club, saying she knew nothing but domestic science. But she hired girls to help with her housework and children and devoted as much time as she could to her husband's career. She rarely missed hearing him speak in the House, for she knew that her presence stimulated him to great effort. She read widely and collated material which proved helpful to him, and her analytical mind helped clarify certain topics for him. Some newspaper reporters even believed they could see her influence in his speeches.

Bryan made it a point to meet every member of the House and as many senators as possible. Congressman William Springer, for whom he had stumped while he was still in college, provided him with some publicity, and Richard L. Metcalfe, now the Washington correspondent of the Omaha World-Herald, gave him extremely favorable reports. Originally judged "one more of those hayseed Congressmen" because he wore striped trousers, an old-fashioned string tie, slouch hat, and Western boots, his handsome features and organ-like voice soon earned him attention. He himself felt right at home; his presence was pre

-49-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
William Jennings Bryan - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 486

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.