William Jennings Bryan - Vol. 1

By Paolo E. Coletta | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 14

Keeping the Faith: 1904

I

"REORGANIZATION means Clevelandism," cried Bryan. "Organize!" he demanded of progressive Democrats. It was no secret, he said, that the trust magnates and financiers believed Roosevelt potentially dangerous and wanted a conservative Democrat to oppose him. They might obtain one, but he predicted that the reorganizers could not write a platform acceptable to the party. Moreover, they were using Cleveland as a "bogie" to force the progressives to accept a compromise candidate who represented his principles yet was less objectionable personally. 1

Reorganizers retorted by calling Bryan a slanderer of his betters and a promoter of hate, strife, and revolution who prated about morality in order to achieve his selfish purposes. Grover Cleveland sneered at the "Bryan-Hearst outfit" and wrote John G. Carlisle that "Such Democrats as you and I are entitled to make our position understood as distinctly and fightingly opposed to any more Democratic fool business," 2 and Henry Watterson editorialized that "Mr. Bryan is first a socialist, then a Democrat." 3 Bryan's reply to Cleveland was sharp, that to Watterson worthy of Wilson's New Freedom. He would not, as the socialists desired, eliminate competition; he would, however, limit the rate of interest and hours of labor and prohibit the sweat shop and the employment of children. He would seek laws that "will lay the axe at the root of the tree, and by making a private monopoly impossible restore industrial independence, and by a revival of competition, give protection to the consumer and stimulus to the producer." 4

Late in February Cleveland refused to be named for President and suggested Richard Olney, George Gray, or Alton B. Parker. By April

____________________
1
Commoner, March 27, May 6, 1904; New York American, July 1, 1904.
2
Letter of February 18, 1904, Grover Cleveland Papers.
3
Louisville Courier-Journal, quoted in Commoner, May 6, 1904.
4
Ibid., May 6, 27, 1904.

-319-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
William Jennings Bryan - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 486

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.