William Jennings Bryan - Vol. 1

By Paolo E. Coletta | Go to book overview

Bibliography

MANUSCRIPTS

BRYAN'S personal papers in the Division of Manuscripts, Library of Congress, constitute the most extensive collection of primary material on his career. Genealogical studies and the Bryan Family Bible in the keeping of the late Mrs. Thomas Stinson Allen (Mary Elizabeth Bryan), Bryan's youngest sister, in Lincoln, Nebraska, shed light on the life and times of Silas Lillard Bryan, their father. The Silas Bryan Papers, used by courtesy of the late Silas Bryan, Bryan's nephew, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, are of inestimable value for the correspondence between William Jennings Bryan and his brother, Charles Wayland Bryan. The Mrs. Ruth Bryan Rohde Papers, which were used in Ossining, New York, are not available to the public; they are valuable for Bryan's college days and courtship. A small collection of Bryan material, the John Peter Altgeld Collection, the Joseph G. Cannon Papers, and the Waldo R. Brown Collection in the Illinois State Historical Society, Springfield, Illinois, help re-create the Illinois of Bryan's youth and Altgeld's contributions to the campaigns of 1896 and 1900. The Henry Moore Teller Papers, in the State Historical Society of Colorado, Denver, also proved helpful in tracing Bryan's political career. A small collection of Bryan papers at the Nebraska State Historical Society, various studies on the history of Nebraska, and the J. Sterling Morton Collection in the Library of the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, give insight into Bryan's relationship to the agrarian crusade and Populist upheaval of the 1890's. The Henry Steele Commager Papers, lent to the author by Professor Henry Steele Commager, of Columbia University, contain copious extracts from the letters of William Vincent Allen, Henry D. Lloyd, George Fred Williams, and William F. Vilas, a number of special studies on Populism, and notes on secondary sources for every phase of Bryan's life. David Bennett Hill's relations to Bryan and the Democratic party are scantily sketched in the George S. Bixby Papers, New York State Library, Albany, New York. Of the other collections in the Division of Manuscripts, Library of Congress, the following were found to be very useful: William Dallas Bynum, Andrew Carnegie, Thomas H. Carter, Grover Cleveland, Josephus Daniels, Don Dickinson, Moreton Frewen, James R. Garfield, Charles S. Hamlin, John Hay, Philander C. Knox, Daniel S. Lamont, William McKinley, L. T. Michener, John T. Morgan, George W. Norris, George Peabody, Louis F. Post, Joseph Pulitzer, Whitelaw Reid,

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