The Romany Rye: A Sequel to "Lavengro" - Vol. 1

By George Borrow; John Murray | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII.

ON the following day there was much feasting amongst the Romany chals of Mr. Petulengro's party. Throughout the forenoon the Romany chies did scarcely anything but cook flesh, and the flesh which they cooked was swine's flesh. About two o'clock, the chals and chies, dividing themselves into various parties, sat down and partook of the fare, which was partly roasted, partly sodden. I dined that day with Mr. Petulengro and his wife and family, Ursula, Mr. and Mrs. Chikno, and Sylvester and his two children. Sylvester, it will be as well to say, was a widower, and had consequently no one to cook his victuals for him, supposing he had any, which was not always the case, Sylvester's affairs being seldom in a prosperous state. He was noted for his bad success in trafficking, notwithstanding the many hints which he received from Jasper, under whose protection he had placed himself, even as Tawno Chikno had done, who himself, as the reader has heard on a former occasion, was anything but a wealthy subject, though he was at all times better off than Sylvester, the Lazarus of the Romany tribe.

All our party ate with a good appetite, except myself, who, feeling rather melancholy that day, had little desire to eat. I did not, like the others, partake of the pork, but got my dinner entirely off the body of a squirrel which had been shot the day before by a chal of the name of Piramus, who, besides being a good shot, was celebrated for his skill in playing on the fiddle. During the dinner a horn filled with ale passed frequently around; I drank of it more than once, and felt inspirited by the draughts. The repast concluded, Sylvester and his children departed to their tent, and Mr. Petulengro, Tawno and myself, getting up, went and lay down under a shady hedge, where Mr. Petulengro, lighting his pipe, began to smoke, and where Tawno presently fell asleep. I was about to fall asleep also, when I heard the sound of music and song. Piramus was playing on the fiddle, whilst Mrs. Chikno, who had a voice of her own, was singing in tones sharp enough, but of great power, a gipsy song:--

-40-

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The Romany Rye: A Sequel to "Lavengro" - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Title Page v
  • Advertisement. (1857.) vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Illustrations xvi
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 5
  • Chapter III 9
  • Chapter IV 16
  • Chapter V 28
  • Chapter VI 32
  • Chapter VII 40
  • Chapter VIII 48
  • Chapter IX 53
  • Chapter X 60
  • Chapter XI 72
  • Chapter XII 78
  • Chapter XIII 86
  • Chapter XIV 89
  • Chapter XV 95
  • Chapter XVI 99
  • Chapter XVII 106
  • Chapter XVIII 113
  • Chapter XIX 117
  • Chapter XX 122
  • Chapter XXI 124
  • Chapter XXII 131
  • Chapter XXIII 136
  • Chapter XXIV 140
  • Chapter XXV 145
  • Chapter XXVI 150
  • Chapter XXVII 158
  • Chapter XXVIII 163
  • Chapter XXIX 170
  • Chapter XXX 175
  • Chapter XXXI 179
  • Chapter XXXII 185
  • Chapte Xxxiii. 191
  • Chapter XXXIV 201
  • Chapter XXXV 209
  • Chapter XXXVI 211
  • Chapter XXXVII 214
  • Chapter XXXVIII 221
  • Chapter Xxxix 223
  • Chapter XL 238
  • Chapter XLI 244
  • Chapter XLII 258
  • Chapter XLIII 273
  • Chapter XLIV 276
  • Chapter XLV 283
  • Chapter XLVI 290
  • Chapter XLVII 300
  • Appendix. 302
  • Chapter III - On Foreign Nonsense. 317
  • Chapter IV - On Gentility Nonsense. 320
  • Chapter IX - Pseudo-Critics 354
  • Notes to the Romany Rye, With - Corrections, Identifications And Translations 379
  • Complete List of Eng. Gypsy Words Scattered Through Lavengro and Romany Rye. 389
  • Bibliography of Editor's Sources. 393
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