Play, Death, and Heroism in Shakespeare

By Kirby Farrell | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1
i.
All quotations are taken from The Riverside Shakespeare, ed. G. Blakemore Evans (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1974).
2.
It may be that rescue fantasies are apt to mask aggressive motives, as Freud postu- lated, and that by sharply defining difference (us-them, hero-enemy), games of battle strengthen boundaries of identity, sorting out desires for infantile merger with power- ful others according to prevailing cultural models. See Chapters 3, 4, and 10.
3.
G. P. V. Akrigg, Jacobean Pageant (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, I963), pp. 145-46.
4.
"There seems no end to the number of resurrection scenes in [the last] plays," William Carroll remarks in The Metamorphoses of Shakespeare's Comedy (Princeton, N. J.: Princeton University Press, 1985), p. 208. As Carroll's study indirectly makes clear, play- death is a type of metamorphosis and historically has elicited many of the same anxi- eties. Perpetuating Augustine's nervousness about shape-shifting, for example, Aquinas decreed, "Those transformations which cannot be produced by the power of nature cannot in reality be effected by the operation of demons; for instance, that the human body be changed into the body of a beast, or that the body of a dead man return to life" (p. 8).
5.
In Northrop Frye's famous formula comedy turns on a "potentially tragic crisis near the end, a ... 'point of ritual death'" from which the main characters at last find deliverance, while mortal crisis is central to the structure of romance. See The Anatomy of Criticism (Princeton, N. J.: Princeton University Press, 1957), p. 179.
6.
Clifford Geertz, The Interpretation of Cultures (New York: Basic Books, 1973), pp. 52, 50.
7.
Thomas M. Greene, The Light in Troy (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, I982), p. 3.
8.
Roy Strong, The Cult of Elizabeth (London: Thames & Hudson, 1977), p. 128.
9.
William Bullein, A Dialogue against the Pestilence (1573, Ist ed. 1564), excerpted in Life in Shakespeare's England, ed. J. Dover Wilson (Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge Uni- versity Press, 1911), p. 135.
10.
Simon Kellway, A Defensative against the Plague (London, 1593).
II.
Mary Douglas, Natural Symbols (New York: Pantheon, 1982), pp. xiv-xv.

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Play, Death, and Heroism in Shakespeare
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Play, Death, and Heroism in Shakespeare *
  • Contents *
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Part One *
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 3
  • Chapter 2 - Play-Death, Self-Effacement, and Autonomy 13
  • Chapter 3 - Play, Death, and Apotheosis 36
  • Chapter 4 - Heroism and Hero Worship 56
  • Chapter 5 - The Hero and the Tomb 74
  • Chapter 6 - The Topography of Death and Heroism 90
  • Part Two *
  • Chapter 7 - Love, Death, and the Hunt in Venus and Adonis 117
  • Chapter 8 - Love, Death, and Patriarchy in Romeo and Juliet 131
  • Chapter 9 - Prophecy and Heroic Destiny in the Histories 148
  • Chapter 10 - Play-Death and Individuation 172
  • Chapter 11 - Epilogue 192
  • Appendix 201
  • Notes 207
  • Index 231
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