The House of the Seven Gables

By Nathaniel Hawthorne; A. Marion Merrill | Go to book overview

IV
A DAY BEHIND THE COUNTER

TOWARDS noon, Hepzibah saw an elderly gentleman, large and portly, and of remarkably dignified demeanor, passing slowly along on the opposite side of the white and dusty street. On coming within the shadow of the Pyncheon Elm, he stopt, and (taking off his hat, meanwhile, to wipe the perspiration from his brow) seemed to scrutinize, with especial interest, the dilapidated and rustyvisaged House of the Seven Gables. He himself, in a very different style, was as well worth looking at as the house. No better model need be sought, nor could have been found, of a very high order of respectability, which, by some indescribable magic, not merely expressed itself in his looks and gestures, but even governed the fashion of his garments, and rendered them all proper and essential to the man. Without appearing to differ, in any tangible way, from other people's clothes, there was yet a wide and rich gravity about them that must have been a characteristic of the wearer, since it could not be defined as pertaining either to the cut or material. His gold- headed cane, too, -- a serviceable staff, of dark polished wood, -- had similar traits, and, had it chosen to take a walk by itself, would have been recognized anywhere as a tolerably adequate representative of its master. This character -- which showed itself so strikingly in everything about him, and the effect of which we seek to convey to

-62-

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The House of the Seven Gables
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • List of Characters viii
  • Introduction xi
  • Bibliography xviii
  • Chronological List of Hawthorne's Works xix
  • I - The Old Pyncheon Family 1
  • II - The Little Shop-Window 31
  • III - The First Customer 45
  • IV - A Day Behind the Counter 62
  • V - May and November 78
  • VI - Maule's Well 96
  • VII - The Guest 109
  • VIII - The Pyncheon of To-Day 128
  • IX - Clifford and Phoebe 148
  • X - The Pyncheon Garden 162
  • XI - The Arched Window 178
  • XII - The Daguerreotypist 194
  • XIII - Alice Pyncheon 210
  • XIV - Phœbe's Good-By 237
  • XV - The Scowl and Smile 250
  • XVI - Clifford's Chamber 269
  • XVII - The Flight of Two Owls 284
  • XVIII - Governor Pyncheon 301
  • XIX - Alice's Posies 320
  • XX - The Flower of Eden 339
  • XXI - The Departure 350
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