Imagination under Pressure, 1789-1832: Aesthetics, Politics, and Utility

By John Whale | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION
1
For an account of the various manifestations of imagination in the eighteenth century and Romantic period, see James Engell, The Creative Imagination: Enlightenment to Romanticism (Cambridge, Mass. and London: Harvard University Press, 1981). Engell's study confidently argues for a coherent, identifiable idea of imagination which reached maturity in the later eighteenth century when it enjoyed its 'brilliant romantic expression'. His preface concludes with the claim that: 'The idea has since been rediscovered a number of times, and each time it has been given even greater value and hope, until imagination is now considered, without question, the supreme value of art and literature' (p. x.).
2
The imaginative creativity and variety within radical culture is evident from the following studies: Iain McCalman, Radical Underworld: Prophets, Revolutionaries, and Pornographers in London, 1795–1840 (Cambridge University Press, 1988); Marcus Wood, Radical Satire and Print Culture 1700–1822 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994); Jon Mee, Dangerous Enthusiasm: William Blake and the Culture of Radicalism in the 1790s (Oxford University Press, 1992); David Worrall, Radical Culture: Discourse, Resistance, and Surveillance, 1790–1820 (Hemel Hempstead: Harvester/Wheatsheaf, 1992).
3
See Jerome Christensen, Coleridge and the Blessed Machine of Language (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1981); Alan Richardson, Literature, Education, and Romanticism: Reading As Social Practice 1780–1832 (Cambridge University Press, 1994); Josephine McDonagh, De Quincey's Disciplines (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994); John Whale, Thomas De Quincey's Reluctant Autobiography (Beckenham and Totowa, N. J.: Croom Helm and Barnes and Noble, 1984), pp. 40–77.
4
See Don H. Bialostosky, Wordsworth, Dialogics, and the Practice of Criticism (New York and Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992), pp. 1–22; Jonathan Arac, Critical Genealogies: Historical Situations for Postmodern Literary Studies (New York: Columbia University Press, 1986), pp. 11–113; Clifford Siskin, The Historicity of Romantic Discourse (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1987) pp. 3–14, 15–36. In his chapter entitled 'The UnKind Imagination' Siskin's attempt at a new literary history which severs the coincidence between Romantic text and Romantic criticism defines

-197-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Imagination under Pressure, 1789-1832: Aesthetics, Politics, and Utility
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Imagination and Revolution 17
  • Chapter 1 - Burke and the Civic Imagination 19
  • Chapter 2 - Paine's Attack on Artifice 42
  • Chapter 3 - Wollstonecraft, Imagination, and Futurity 68
  • Part II - Imagination and Utility 98
  • Chapter 4 - Hazlitt and the Limits of the Sympathetic Imagination 110
  • Chapter 5 - Cobbett's Imaginary Landscape 140
  • Chapter 6 - Coleridge and the Afterlife of Imagination 166
  • Afterword 194
  • Notes 197
  • Bibliography 227
  • Index 237
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 243

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.