The House of the Seven Gables

By Nathaniel Hawthorne; A. Marion Merrill | Go to book overview

with all its pictured earth and sky scene, vanished as if it had never been.

At length, just as an elderly gentleman of very dignified presence happened to be passing, a large bubble sailed majestically down, and burst right against his nose! He looked up, -- at first with a stern, keen glance, which penetrated at once into the obscurity behind the arched window, -- then with a smile which might be conceived as diffusing a dog-day sultriness for the space of several yards about him.

"Aha, Cousin Clifford!" cried Judge Pyncheon. "What! still blowing soap-bubbles!"

The tone seemed as if meant to be kind and soothing, but yet had a bitterness of sarcasm in it. As for Clifford, an absolute palsy of fear came over him. Apart from any definite cause of dread which his past experience might have given him, he felt that native and original horror of the excellent Judge which is proper to a weak, delicate, and apprehensive character in the presence of massive strength. Strength is incomprehensible by weakness, and, therefore, the more terrible. There is no greater bugbear than a strong-willed relative in the circle of his own connections.

-193-

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The House of the Seven Gables
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • List of Characters viii
  • Introduction xi
  • Bibliography xviii
  • Chronological List of Hawthorne's Works xix
  • I - The Old Pyncheon Family 1
  • II - The Little Shop-Window 31
  • III - The First Customer 45
  • IV - A Day Behind the Counter 62
  • V - May and November 78
  • VI - Maule's Well 96
  • VII - The Guest 109
  • VIII - The Pyncheon of To-Day 128
  • IX - Clifford and Phoebe 148
  • X - The Pyncheon Garden 162
  • XI - The Arched Window 178
  • XII - The Daguerreotypist 194
  • XIII - Alice Pyncheon 210
  • XIV - Phœbe's Good-By 237
  • XV - The Scowl and Smile 250
  • XVI - Clifford's Chamber 269
  • XVII - The Flight of Two Owls 284
  • XVIII - Governor Pyncheon 301
  • XIX - Alice's Posies 320
  • XX - The Flower of Eden 339
  • XXI - The Departure 350
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