The House of the Seven Gables

By Nathaniel Hawthorne; A. Marion Merrill | Go to book overview

XVI
CLIFFORD'S CHAMBER

NEVER had the old house appeared so dismal to poor Hepzibah as when she departed on that wretched errand. There was a strange aspect in it. As she trode along the foot-worn passages, and opened one crazy door after another, and ascended the creaking staircase, she gazed wistfully and fearfully around. It would have been no marvel, to her excited mind, if, behind or beside her, there had been the rustle of dead people's garments, or pale visages awaiting her on the landing-place above. Her nerves were set all ajar by the scene of passion and terror through which she had just struggled. Her colloquy with Judge Pyncheon, who so perfectly represented the person and attributes of the founder of the family, had called back the dreary past. It weighed upon her heart. Whatever she had heard, from legendary aunts and grandmothers, concerning the good or evil fortunes of the Pyncheons, -- stories which had heretofore been kept warm in her remembrance by the chimney-corner glow that was associated with them, -- now recurred to her, sombre, ghastly, cold, like most passages of family history, when brooded over in melancholy mood. The whole seemed little else but a series of calamity, reproducing itself in successive generations, with one general hue, and varying in little, save the outline. But Hepzibah now felt as if the Judge, and Clifford, and herself, -- they three together, -- were

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The House of the Seven Gables
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • List of Characters viii
  • Introduction xi
  • Bibliography xviii
  • Chronological List of Hawthorne's Works xix
  • I - The Old Pyncheon Family 1
  • II - The Little Shop-Window 31
  • III - The First Customer 45
  • IV - A Day Behind the Counter 62
  • V - May and November 78
  • VI - Maule's Well 96
  • VII - The Guest 109
  • VIII - The Pyncheon of To-Day 128
  • IX - Clifford and Phoebe 148
  • X - The Pyncheon Garden 162
  • XI - The Arched Window 178
  • XII - The Daguerreotypist 194
  • XIII - Alice Pyncheon 210
  • XIV - Phœbe's Good-By 237
  • XV - The Scowl and Smile 250
  • XVI - Clifford's Chamber 269
  • XVII - The Flight of Two Owls 284
  • XVIII - Governor Pyncheon 301
  • XIX - Alice's Posies 320
  • XX - The Flower of Eden 339
  • XXI - The Departure 350
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