Veering Right: How the Bush Administration Subverts the Law for Conservative Causes

By Charles Tiefer | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Doing this real-time analysis of the Bush administration has depended upon extraordinary people generously giving me extraordinary help, particularly to handle the challenge of penetrating the administration's secretiveness. All mentioned here are absolved of all responsibility for what these pages say.

I express special thanks to the scores of journalists who helped, in their funny way. They called me up pretty constantly because I'm a law professor who opines a lot; who served from 1979 to 1995 first in the Senate and then as the solicitor of the House of Representatives in posts that let me be near the action; and whose thousand-page treatise on congressional procedure, with its two thousand footnotes, signifies having lots of opinions about how leaders get things done for their causes in Washington. The press's questions consistently contained more source material, more of the journalists' own comparisons and analysis, and more of the emerging sense of what the administration is up to than is available any other way. I won't name these coworkers individually, apart from their queen, Gwen Ifill, who interviewed me on the Lehrer NewsHour. But you would find them on ABC World News Tonight, Black Entertainment Television, CBS radio, C-Span, McLaughlin One-on-One, MSNBC, NBC Nightly News, and NPR; published in the Baltimore Sun, Chicago Tribune, Legal Times of Washington, Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and many other domestic print outlets; and in numerous foreign broadcast and print sources as well. Bless them all for calling (or filming) and chatting. Especially bless those whose reaction to my first comments was to snort or to laugh and then to challenge me with their own superior understanding.

I similarly owe huge debts to many congressional and administration staff, and a few members of Congress whom it's probably more discrete

-ix-

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Veering Right: How the Bush Administration Subverts the Law for Conservative Causes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Getting Ready to Veer Right 9
  • 2 - The Social Conservative Agenda 35
  • 3 - Libraries or Weapons? 77
  • 4 - Domestic Affairs Veer Right 104
  • 5 - The Corruptio 128
  • 6 - Going It Alone 157
  • 7 - Veering from Riyadh to Baghdad 189
  • 8 - Blindfolding the Public 237
  • 9 - If This Goes On 296
  • Notes 321
  • Bibliography 397
  • Index 423
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