Handbook of Parenting - Vol. 5

By Marc H. Bornstein | Go to book overview

6
Parental Socialization and
Children's Acquisition of Values
Joan E. Grusec
University of Toronto

INTRODUCTION

The term socialization broadly refers to the way in which individuals are assisted in the acquisition of skills necessary to function successfully as members of their social group. Bugental and Goodnow (1998) describe it as the continuous collaboration of elders and novices, of old hands and newcomers, as the latter with the help of the former develop the attitudes, behaviors, values, standards, and motives that enable novices and newcomers to become part of the social community. There is considerable debate about the relative importance of different kinds of elders or old hands. Frequently considered as most important are parents. But other agents of socialization include teachers, older siblings, peers, formal institutions, and the media. This chapter focuses on parents who, for a variety of reasons, can be considered to be primary sources of influence. Thus Kuczynski and Grusec (1997) have argued that parents are most influential in the socialization of children for a number of reasons: socialization, which has evolved as an adaptive evolutionary strategy, is a biosocial system set up to favor the parent's primary influence on the child; society designates parents (or parent surrogates) as primarily responsible for socialization; parents have greater time and opportunity to develop relationships with children, with these relationships essential for successful socialization; and parents also have greater opportunity to monitor their children's actions, another centrally important aspect of successful socialization.

Socialization determines several outcomes in children. One is the development of self-regulation of emotion, thinking, and behavior. The second is the acquisition of a culture's standards, attitudes, and values, including appropriate and willing conformity to and cooperation with the direction of authority figures. The final outcome of socialization is what Kuczynski and Grusec have termed “collateral effects. ” During the course of helping children develop self-regulation and acquire values and standards, parents also less intentionally teach role-taking skills, strategies for resolving conflicts, and ways of viewing relationships. Their modes of interaction also promote or hinder the development

-143-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Parenting - Vol. 5
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 507

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.