The New Biological Weapons: Threat, Proliferation, and Control

By Malcolm Dando | Go to book overview

10
The Future of Arms Control

This book began with Stuart Croft's suggestion that the international community has developed a set of arms control tools to deal with the various problems that have arisen in different historical periods (1). Although the nature of the global order that will evolve and stabilize as the current post-Cold War, transitional era comes to a close is still the subject of intense debate, and though some commentators are rather pessimistic about what arms control may have left to contribute, the position adopted here is in line with those who pragmatically expect to see many future roles for arms control (2, 3, 4, 5, 6). In particular, while consideration will continue to be given to a variety of ways of dealing with the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, arms control must remain central (7, 8). As the UK Ministry of Defence stated in its major review of the threat from biological and chemical weapons in mid-1999, “[t]he foundation for managing the risks is diplomatic: international pressure to agree acceptable norms of behaviour; disarmament and non-proliferation initiatives; and preventing the supply of materials needed for biological and chemical weapons programmes” (9). The question then is, What kind of arms control is likely to develop?


INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW
(THE LAWS OF WAR)

Since the mid-nineteenth century, the prohibition of the use of weapons that cause superfluous injury or unnecessary suffering, embodied in the St. Petersburg Declaration, has influenced multilateral arms control negotiations. After extensive use of chemical weapons in World War I had led to some 1.3 million casualties and 100,000 deaths, the International Committee of the Red Cross stated: “We wish to-day to take a stand against a barbaric

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The New Biological Weapons: Threat, Proliferation, and Control
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Tables & Figures vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • 1 - Technological Change and Arms Control 1
  • References *
  • 2 - Operational Toxin and Bioregulatory Weapons 17
  • References *
  • 3 - Concerns About the Misuses of Biotechnology 33
  • References *
  • 4 - Toxins 45
  • References *
  • 5 - Bioregulatory Peptides 67
  • References *
  • 6 - Specificity: Receptors 87
  • References *
  • 7 - Agent Delivery 103
  • References *
  • 8 - Targets 117
  • References *
  • 9 - Can the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention Be Strengthened? 133
  • References *
  • 10 - The Future of Arms Control 153
  • References *
  • Acronyms & Abbreviations 163
  • Further Reading 167
  • Index 169
  • About the Book 181
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 181

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.