The Law of Internal Armed Conflict

By Lindsay Moir | Go to book overview

1
The historical regulation of internal
armed conflict

It is perhaps trite to observe that non-international, or internal, armed conflicts have been commonplace throughout history. They have occurred for a variety of reasons, such as the desire to overthrow one government and replace it with another, or the desire of one or more parts of a State to secede from the rest and achieve independence. Particularly relevant for two reasons, however, was the demise of colonial rule in Africa and Asia.1 First, colonised peoples frequently rose up against the colonial power in an effort to gain independence,2 and secondly, upon achieving independence, violent internal struggles for power frequently ensued, often along tribal, ethnic and religious lines.

The legal regulation of internal armed conflict has continued to grow in importance in the post-colonial era. Since 1945, the vast majority of armed conflicts have been internal rather than international in character.3 Kofi Annan, Secretary-General of the United Nations, has stated that 'wars between sovereign States appear to be a phenomenon in distinct decline'.4 Unfortunately, this is not true of internal armed conflict and, to make matters worse, time has witnessed an apparent diminution in the application of the laws of war to internal armed conflicts, from their general observance in the 1861–1865 American Civil

____________________
1
Many similar characteristics have been seen more recently in the demise of Soviet influence and Communist rule in Eastern Europe.
2
As Algeria did against France in 1954, for example. Such conflicts would now be classed as international rather than internal under Article 1(4) of Additional Protocol I of 1977. See below at pp. 89–90.
3
Statistics compiled by the International Peace Institute in Oslo suggest that in the period 1990–1995, seventy-three States were involved in armed conflicts, of which fifty-nine were involved in internal conflict or civil war. See Dan Smith, The State of War and Peace Atlas, 3rd edn (London, 1997), 90–95.
4
Preface to UNHCR, The State of the World's Refugees (Oxford, 1997), ix.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Law of Internal Armed Conflict
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 307

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.