Fatal Women of Romanticism

By Adriana Craciun | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION
1
Hoeveler, Romantic Androgyny; Andriano, Our Ladies of Darkness; Fass, La Belle Dame sans Merci. On the Victorian period and after see: Stott, The Fabrication of the Late Victorian Femme Fatale; Allen, The Femme Fatale; Dijkstra, Idols of Perversity. Additional works on the femme fatale will be noted in subsequent chapters.
2
Ezell, Writing Women's Literary History. Such modern anthologies begin with Gilbert and Gubar's Norton Anthology of Literature by Women (1985).
3
Nancy Armstrong makes this point regarding the history of the novel in Desire and Domestic Fiction.
4
Much of this scholarship builds upon Michel Foucault's pioneering work on the history of the body and of sexuality, particularly in his three volume History of Sexuality, Discipline and Punish, and Herculine Barbin. See for example: Sawicki, Disciplining Foucault; Diamond and Quimby, eds., Feminism and Foucault; Ramazanoglu, ed., Up Against Foucault; McKay, Foucault and Feminism; Stanton, ed., Discourses of Sexuality.
5
Birke, Feminism and the Biological Body; Grosz, Volatile Bodies; Haraway, Simians, Cyborgs, and Women; Herdt, ed., Third Sex, Third Gender; Judith Butler, Gender Trouble and Bodies That Matter; Arthur and Marilouise Kroker, eds., The Last Sex; Bordo, Unbearable Weight; Wittig, The Lesbian Body and The Straight Mind; Scarry, The Body in Pain.
6
Laqueur, Making Sex, 154, 174.
7
Schiebinger summarizes that “the great public dramas of the eighteenth century–the struggle for enfranchisement and the abolition of slaveryexposed the Janus-face of nature destined to plague democratic orders for the next two hundred years: inclusion in the polis rested on notions of natural equalities, while exclusion from it rested on notions of natural differences” (Nature's Body, 9–10, orig. emphasis). See also Schiebinger's The Mind Has No Sex?
8
Jill Matus's Unstable Bodies shows how Victorian scientific and literary texts alike anxiously questioned the stability of the supposedly natural two-sex system, focusing on instances of sexual “slippage” and unnatural embodiment, and thereby provides a much-needed rigorous examination of the instability

-251-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Fatal Women of Romanticism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 328

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.