European Economic Integration: Limits and Prospects

By Alexis Jacquemin; Miroslav N. Jovanovic | Go to book overview

PREFACE

A period of Eurosclerosis and Euro-pessimism in the 1970s and early 1980s received an antidote in the form of the 1992 Programme, devised in 1985. The objective of this ‘technical’ Programme was to remove non-tariff barriers on internal trade in the European Union, open up the internal market, stimulate competition and, hence, increase welfare in the region. The next logical step to consolidate the earlier achievements in European integration by the elimination of exchange-rate fluctuations was the move towards the economic and monetary union that came with the Maastricht Treaty (1991). European economic and political integration gained momentum. Or, did it? In spite of long and positive declarations of many European Councils on European integration, limitations to the integration process, such as those in the monetary sphere, began to appear. In other areas, such as education, transport policy or environment there are many unexplored prospects for integration.

When big changes occur, such as the 1992 Programme, moves towards economic and monetary union, not to mention the reunification of Germany or disintegration of the eastern bloc, then interest is aroused as opportunities to redesign Europe are rare. The democratic system and market economy of the 15 countries of the European Union, with different degrees of success, provided a fairly flexible foundation for a relatively smooth absorption of the changes brought by these challenges. That is why the system adapted and survived. However, has the European integration exhausted itself? Are there limits to European economic integration? The answer to these questions is negative. For example, if certain ambitious approaches to integration such as economic and monetary union as based on the Maastricht Treaty (and with criteria that are not known in the theory of international monetary integration) are dead, that does not mean that the idea of European integration is dead too. On the contrary. There are many other areas for European integration, including monetary integration. Perhaps, a bit less in the monetary-integration sphere over a longer timescale than established by the Maastricht Treaty may produce a better and more stable European Union in the future, as well as preserve unity with diversity.

The objective of this book is to look into the origin, evolution, operation and prospects for economic integration in the European Union. Economic integration of some of the oldest nations in the world with different organizational traditions and history, full of secular conflicts, is a tremendously difficult, but highly rewarding, political and economic task. Economic integration between relatively small and medium-sized countries can be defended with the same arguments which are used

-xiv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
European Economic Integration: Limits and Prospects
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents vii
  • Figures viii
  • Tables ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xiv
  • Acknowledgements xviii
  • Abbreviations xix
  • 1 - The Origin of the European Union 1
  • 2 - Monetary Policy 42
  • 3 - Fiscal Policy and the Budget 71
  • 4 - Common Agricultural Policy 98
  • 5 - Competition Policy 130
  • 6 - Industrial Policy in Manufacturing and Services 168
  • 7 - Trade Policy 215
  • 8 - Regional Policy 287
  • 9 - Capital Mobility 309
  • 10 - Labour Mobility 333
  • 11 - Social Policy 342
  • 12 - Environment Policy 353
  • 13 - Transport Policy 361
  • 14 - Conclusion 367
  • Bibliography 371
  • Index 382
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 389

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.