The Grammar of Irish English: Language in Hibernian Style

By Markku Filppula | Go to book overview

3

MAJOR ISSUES IN THE STUDY OF HIBERNO-ENGLISH

3.1

General characteristics of Hiberno-English grammar

3.1.1

Distinctiveness of HE vis-à-vis other dialects of English

At the phonetic and phonological levels, the Irish dialects of English are easily recognisable: the ‘Irish accent’ (or accents, rather) displays certain features common to most speakers even regardless of their educational, social, or regional backgrounds. Distinctiveness in that respect can hardly be questioned, although scholars may differ on the question of the origins of some of these features.

The grammar of HE presents a much more multifarious picture, because social and regional considerations, alongside time, play a significant role here. While present-day ‘educated speech’ strives towards the StE norm in all essential respects, the speech of those with less formal education in rural settings especially, but also in urban working-class contexts, abounds in grammatical features which are sometimes far removed from the norms and usages of StE grammar. As said in the Introduction (Chapter 1), this study focuses on the latter type of rural and urban speech varieties, which can be subsumed under the heading of ‘traditional vernacular’. At that level, there is a lot of evidence of usages which differentiate HE from other dialects of English, and from what we know of the earlier forms of HE speech we can assume that these differences were even sharper in the past.

Let us first look at how the distinctive character of HE has been captured in the earliest research. Hayden and Hartog outline the three major elements which give HE its special flavour as follows:

I. Survivals of Tudor and Stuart English words that have disappeared from SE [StE], as well as of ancient meanings and constructions, besides such transformations of meaning and metaphor as have arisen from a development isolated from England, and not necessarily due to Gaelic [Irish] influence.

II. Peculiarities due to Gaelic influence. These we may consider under the two heads: (a) borrowings of Gaelic words, often more or less altered in the transfer; (b) borrowings (that is, literal translations) of Gaelic idioms.

-12-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Grammar of Irish English: Language in Hibernian Style
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures ix
  • Tables x
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The English Language in Ireland 4
  • 3 - Major Issues in the Study of Hiberno-English 12
  • 4 - Databases and Methods 36
  • 5 - The Noun Phrase 55
  • 6 - The Verb Phrase 89
  • 7 - Questions, Responses, and Negation 160
  • 8 - The Complex Sentence 184
  • 9 - Prepositional Usage 218
  • 10 - Focusing Devices 242
  • 11 - Discussion and Conclusions 271
  • Notes 299
  • Bibliography 309
  • Index 322
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.