The Grammar of Irish English: Language in Hibernian Style

By Markku Filppula | Go to book overview

8

THE COMPLEX SENTENCE

8.1

Introduction

In this chapter I will discuss selected features which are not confined to the clausal level but have the ‘complex sentence’ or the ‘superordinate clause’ as their domain. 1 As a rule, the HE patterns of complex sentences correspond to those found in other dialects of English, but there are some which exhibit features possibly based on the model of Irish. One such feature is the use of so-called ‘resumptive pronouns’ in relative and also other types of clauses. These will be discussed in section 8.2. Another distinctive trait of HE grammar concerns sentence or clause connection: the predominant linking device is and, which besides the usual coordinate function can introduce subordinate structures. The latter will be the topic of section 8.3. Another pair of conjunctions which can be argued to have special functions (or at least more extensive uses) in HE consists of only and but, which will be examined in section 8.4.

Features which cannot be investigated within the bounds of this work include, first, the so-called ‘Narrative Infinitive’, examples of which are given in (1) and (2). The first example is taken from the HE corpus, while the second is from a nineteenth-century emigrant letter. This use of the infinitive has been attributed to the influence of Irish, which has the verbal noun in these kinds of contexts (for discussion, see, e.g. Joyce 1910/1988: 45-6; van Hamel 1912: 279; Henry 1957: 188-90; Bliss 1984a: 147-8). On the basis of my data at least, the Narrative Infinitive is relatively infrequent in present-day dialects and is probably a recessive feature.

(1) If you, if you was there now, you had a son, = an’ your daughter would have gone away, = you know, you’d to be a good thing, he to get a wife, like, to = run the house with him, you see. (Clare: J. N. )

(2) I was very sorry to hear of you to let your old chapel to be chifted [i.e. shifted] to (Ballydafeen). O poor Derry [the townland of Caheraderry in Co. Clare] is gone and to let them crow over yea. (The Normile Letters, No. 12, 1862; quoted from Fitzpatrick 1994: 90)

-184-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Grammar of Irish English: Language in Hibernian Style
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures ix
  • Tables x
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The English Language in Ireland 4
  • 3 - Major Issues in the Study of Hiberno-English 12
  • 4 - Databases and Methods 36
  • 5 - The Noun Phrase 55
  • 6 - The Verb Phrase 89
  • 7 - Questions, Responses, and Negation 160
  • 8 - The Complex Sentence 184
  • 9 - Prepositional Usage 218
  • 10 - Focusing Devices 242
  • 11 - Discussion and Conclusions 271
  • Notes 299
  • Bibliography 309
  • Index 322
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.