The Grammar of Irish English: Language in Hibernian Style

By Markku Filppula | Go to book overview

NOTES

2 THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE IN IRELAND
1
These are areas officially designated as Irish-speaking. According to The Gaeltacht, an information booklet on the present-day Irish-speaking areas, the Gaeltacht comprises some coastal areas in the counties of Kerry, Galway, Mayo, and Donegal; it also includes the Aran Islands, the island of Aranmore, and Clear Island. Furthermore, small pockets of Irish-speaking are found in the mountain area of West Cork, on the Waterford coast, and as far east as Co. Meath. The total area covers some 4,800 square kilometres, and it has a population of about 79,000, of whom some three-quarters are Irish-speaking.

3 MAJOR ISSUES IN THE STUDY OF HIBERNO-ENGLISH
1
Cf. Harris (1990:73) on ‘contact Englishes’, which he defines as ‘vernacular varieties of English which have developed in circumstances of large-scale language contact and shift’.
2
I am grateful to Howard B. Clarke of the Department of Medieval History in UCD for making his paper available to me.
3
Foster (1988: 117, fn. (i)) describes Dineley [note the spelling] as a traveller and an antiquary, who travelled around Ireland in 1680 and wrote Observations on a Voyage through the Kingdom of Ireland, which is evidently the same text as the one referred to by Hogan.
4
Cf. however, the possible objections referred to in Tristram (1997: 19-20).

4 DATABASES AND METHODS
1
My thanks are due to Professor Bo Almqvist for permission to use the material collected by the Department, and to Professor Seamas Ó Catháin for his valuable assistance in the choice of the texts. I am also indebted to Mr Tom Munnelly, who collected this material from Clare, and who kindly gave me further information about the persons interviewed and about the linguistic situation in the relevant localities.
2
I am grateful to Mr Vincent J. Bradley, R. T. É. Programmes Administration Manager, for permission to use the two interviews for linguistic purposes.
3
With the exception of one addition to the Kerry material (the interview of C. D. from Caherdaniel), the HE corpus is the same as that used for my doctoral dissertation (see Filppula 1986).
4
Cf. Ihalainen (1976) and (1980), in which a similar ‘soft’ method of data gathering was used.

-299-

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The Grammar of Irish English: Language in Hibernian Style
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures ix
  • Tables x
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The English Language in Ireland 4
  • 3 - Major Issues in the Study of Hiberno-English 12
  • 4 - Databases and Methods 36
  • 5 - The Noun Phrase 55
  • 6 - The Verb Phrase 89
  • 7 - Questions, Responses, and Negation 160
  • 8 - The Complex Sentence 184
  • 9 - Prepositional Usage 218
  • 10 - Focusing Devices 242
  • 11 - Discussion and Conclusions 271
  • Notes 299
  • Bibliography 309
  • Index 322
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