The State and Ethnic Politics in Southeast Asia

By David Brown | Go to book overview

Chapter 7

Ethnicity, nationalism and democracy

In the foregoing examinations of the differing characterizations of the state, ethnicity has been depicted as related, variously, to the collapse of traditional authority structures, to the state’s managerial institutions, to the factional rivalries amongst political élites, to regional economic disparities, and to the class structure of society. Clearly, if each or any of these features of the political, social and economic environment were intrinsic to the nature of ethnicity, then the discussion would contain a central inconsistency. It has been argued here, however, that these aspects of the environment are only contingently related to ethnicity; while what is intrinsic to ethnicity is its ideological character—as a psychological and political kinship myth. Both the type of cultural attributes to which this myth attaches, and the kind of economic, political or social mechanisms by which it is engendered are, it has been argued, crucially influenced by the character of the state.

Thus the discussions have had two purposes: to offer explanations of the various patterns of ethnic politics in Southeast Asia, and to explore different models of the state so as to make explicit some of their ethnic implications. The intention has been to narrow the perceived gap, frequently evident in Southeast Asian studies, between the recognition and description of the unique politics of each country, and attempts at comparative and conceptual analysis. The resultant argument has been in two stages: that ethnic consciousness constitutes an emotionally powerful ideological response to the pattern of insecurities generated by the power structure of the state, and therefore that the character of the state constitutes the dominant influence upon the character of ethnic politics. The exploration

-258-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The State and Ethnic Politics in Southeast Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.