Social and Cultural Lives of Immune Systems

By James M. Wilce Jr | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

The chapters in this book are selected and revised from papers presented at panels (sharing their title with this book) at the 1997 meetings of the Society for Medical Anthropology (Seattle, March) and the American Anthropological Association (AAA; Washington, DC, November). The panels brought together psychologists, anthropologists, and immunologists interested in the relation of culture and social organization to notions of, and actual workings of, immune systems. Volume contributors Napier and Kirmayer offered comments on the AAA papers that were exceedingly helpful in moving the volume onward.

In a broad sense the ideas arose out of an accident - the fact that the editor encountered James Pennebaker’s work during his graduate studies in anthropology at UCLA, a hotbed of interest in psychoneuroimmunology (PNI). In addition to Pennebaker, I received encouragement to bring about this sort of interdisciplinary rapprochement from contributor Daniel Moerman, who also convened the roundtable, “Placebo and Nocebo Effects: Developing a Research Agenda, ” sponsored by the Program in Alternative Medicine of the NIH, in Bethesda, December 1996 at which I was a rather passive participant. My work at the intersection of culture and PNI has also been encouraged over the years by my colleagues in Arizona - Heidi Wayment and Steven Barger at NAU, and Steve Hoffman at ASU. In the years since the 1997 panels that gave rise to these papers, our series editor Susan DiGiacomo has given constant support, for which we are all grateful.

A version of Daniel Moerman’s chapter appeared in Medical Anthropology Quarterly (14(1), 2000). We are grateful to the American Anthropological Association for permission to include it here.

A version of Cone and Martin’s chapter appeared in The Visible Woman, edited by Paula Treichler and Constance Penley. We are grateful to NYU Press for permission to reprint this revision here.

Finally, Julene Knox at Routledge has rallied the resources of the press and guided the book into paper. Thank you, Julene.

-x-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social and Cultural Lives of Immune Systems
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 318

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.