The Routledge Handbook of Greek Mythology

By Robin Hard | Go to book overview

NOTES

The forth coming references are intended above all to indicate the main ancient sources for mythical narratives and mythological information in the preceding text; references to secondary sources have been kept to a minimum. Except in the case of myths that are recorded in very few accounts or only a single account, the references to ancient accounts of mythical narratives are not exhaustive; although more sources, especially from the Latin literature, could often have been cited, it can be more confusing than helpful to pile up references to obscure, repetitive or misleading accounts from the later record. Special attention is paid to the pre-Hellenistic tradition, and a special effort has been made to include accounts that are easily accessible in English translation (even if this is not possible in every case). For readers who wish to seek more detailed information on early sources, Timothy Gantz’s Early Greek Myth (see the Bibliographical Note) can be recommended; and in the footnotes to his Loeb edition of Apollodorus’ Library (Harvard, first published in 1921), Sir James Frazer provides useful lists of references to sources of every period for most important myths.

Conventional abbreviations are generally used for authors and their works. For Greek authors, these usually accord with those listed at the front of the Greek lexicon of Liddell and Scott; but longer forms have sometimes been used to make them more immediately intelligible to the general reader, and the names of works of literature are sometimes cited in English translation for the same reason. Some of the abbreviations that will be most frequently encountered are listed below; for further information on these and other authors and their works, please see the little dictionary of literary sources for Greek myth in Chapter 1.

Ael.

Aelian (V. H. = Varia Historia, i.e. Historical Miscellany)

Aesch.

Aeschylus

Ant. Lib.

Antoninus Liberalis

Apollod.

Apollodorus (i.e. the Library; Epit. = Epitome, referring to the latter part of the work which is preserved only in epitomized form)

A. R.

Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica

Arist.

Aristophanes

Athen.

Athenaeus

-603-

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