The World of Juba II and Kleopatra Selene: Royal Scholarship on Rome's African Frontier

By Duane W. Roller | Go to book overview

ILLUSTRATIONS
Figures
1 The Numidian marble quarries at Chemtou (Tunisia) 13
2 The site of Zama, looking southwest from Kbor Klib 37
3 Tarraco (modern Tarragona), where Juba II was named king 99
4 Caesarea: theater 122
5 Caesarea: site of forum 124
6 Caesarea: view of offshore island, with site of palace in foreground 125
7 Caesarea: site of palace and view south across city 126
8 The Oued Bellah aqueduct bridge, east of Caesarea 128
9 The Mauretanian Royal Mausoleum 129
10 Volubilis: view of site from the east 131
11 Sala: view northeast across forum 134
12 Lixos: view south across center of site 134
13 Garum factory on the Atlantic coast of Mauretania, at the site said to be Cotta 135
14 Tingis and the view northeast across to Spain 136
15 Portrait bust of Juba I, from Cherchel 140
16 Gilded silver dish from Boscoreale, perhaps representing Kleopatra Selene 141
17 Petubastes IV, from Cherchel 143
18 Cuirass statue, probably of Augustus, from Cherchel 145
19 Portrait bust of Juba II, from Rome 147
20 Ptolemaios of Mauretania, from Cherchel 149
21 The “Purple Islands” at Mogador (Essaouira) 185
22 The Canary Islands: ancient Ninguaria (modern Tenerife) 186
23 The High Atlas 186
24 The canyon of the Ziz River, perhaps Juba’s “upper Nile” 195
25 Numidian and Mauretanian coins 245
a Bilingual bronze coin of Juba I with temple on the reverse
b Reverse of above

-vii-

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The World of Juba II and Kleopatra Selene: Royal Scholarship on Rome's African Frontier
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Juba’s Numidian Ancestry 11
  • 2 - Mauretania 39
  • 3 - Juba’s Youth and Education 59
  • 4 - Kleopatra Selene 76
  • 5 - The Mauretanian Client Kingdom 91
  • 6 - The Artistic and Cultural Program of Juba and Kleopatra Selene 119
  • 7 - Rex Literatissimus 163
  • 8 - Libyka 183
  • 9 - The Eastern Expedition with Gaius Caesar 212
  • 10 - On Arabia 227
  • 11 - The Mauretanian Dynasty 244
  • Epilogue 257
  • Appendix 1 261
  • Appendix 2 264
  • Appendix 3 267
  • Bibliography 276
  • List of Passages Cited 310
  • Index 319
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