The World of Juba II and Kleopatra Selene: Royal Scholarship on Rome's African Frontier

By Duane W. Roller | Go to book overview

10

ON ARABIA

The most lasting result of Juba’s time with Gaius Caesar was his final scholarly work, On Arabia. It was written between AD2, when Juba detached himself from Gaius’ expedition and went to Kappadokia and married Glaphyra, and AD5, when he abandoned her and returned to Mauretania. 1 It represented the culmination both of his scholarly talents and of geographical and natural historical knowledge of the latter Augustan period.

Although On Arabia is cited by name only three times, 3 nearly thirty additional fragments survive from this treatise, almost all from Pliny’s Natural History, and covering a geographical range from the Nile to India. 4 Many are about natural history, but cultural history, trade and commerce, and ethnography are also among the topics. There is no indication of the length of the work. Sources include Ptolemaic explorers, the Alexander historians and chroniclers, Berossos, Poseidonios, and Juba’s own autopsy. When On Arabia is coupled with Libyka, it can be seen that Juba created an extensive and wide-ranging treatise that covered all the southern half of the known world, from West Africa to India. In fact, it is difficult to divide the two works, since material about the Nile, its upper regions, and East Africa blends seamlessly into that about the Red Sea and the Arabian peninsula.

Libyka would have been completed before Augustus commissioned Juba to join his grandson’s entourage. Where it left off cannot easily be determined: the source of the Nile was a necessary component

1 Infra, pp. 247-9.

2 Jacoby, Commentary, pp. 326-8; RE, pp. 2391-2.

3 NH 6. 141, 12.56, 32.10=Juba, frs. 1-3.

4 Juba, frs. 28-37, 41, 46, 62-79. On Pliny’s use of Juba as a source, see Klaus Günther Sallmann, Die Geographie des älteren Plinius und ihrem Verhältnis zu Varro: Versuch einer Quellenanalyse, Untersuchungen zur antiken Literatur und Geschichte 11 (Berlin 1971), pp. 85-8; on his description of Arabia, see Henry I. MacAdam, “Strabo, Pliny the Elder and Ptolemy of Alexandria: Three Views of Ancient Arabia and Its Peoples, ” in L’Arabie préislamique et son environnement historique et culturel, ed. T. Fahd (Strasbourg: Université des sciences humaines de Strasbourg, 1989), pp. 291-5.

5 Juba, fr. 38a.

-227-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The World of Juba II and Kleopatra Selene: Royal Scholarship on Rome's African Frontier
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Juba’s Numidian Ancestry 11
  • 2 - Mauretania 39
  • 3 - Juba’s Youth and Education 59
  • 4 - Kleopatra Selene 76
  • 5 - The Mauretanian Client Kingdom 91
  • 6 - The Artistic and Cultural Program of Juba and Kleopatra Selene 119
  • 7 - Rex Literatissimus 163
  • 8 - Libyka 183
  • 9 - The Eastern Expedition with Gaius Caesar 212
  • 10 - On Arabia 227
  • 11 - The Mauretanian Dynasty 244
  • Epilogue 257
  • Appendix 1 261
  • Appendix 2 264
  • Appendix 3 267
  • Bibliography 276
  • List of Passages Cited 310
  • Index 319
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.