Greece in the European Union

By Dionyssis G. Dimitrakopoulos; Argyris G. Passas | Go to book overview

9

Conclusion

Europeanisation and the Greek policy style: national or sectoral?

Dionyssis G. Dimitrakopoulos and Argyris G. Passas


The logic of ‘Europeanisation’

In the Introduction to this volume we hypothesised that Europeanisation - i.e. the transformation of domestic norms, rules of the game and organisational arrangements resulting from a country’s membership of the EU, is likely to follow sectoral patterns for three key reasons. First, as Lowi’s seminal typology of public policies suggests, politics has sectoral characteristics (Lowi 1972:299) in the sense that the likelihood of the use of coercion - the central feature of governing - and the context in which it happens differs across policy areas. Second, the competence of the EU varies across policy areas. Its role is much more pronounced in areas of ‘economic’ integration such as the internal market and market-correcting policies such as the protection of the environment and social regulation, than it is in, say, foreign policy. Third, the EU is a law-intensive organisation (Page and Dimitrakopoulos 1997) that primarily relies on regulation whilst its distributive and redistributive functions have remained underdeveloped. As a result, the pressure that it exerts is not uniform. In Hood’s (1983) terms, the EU makes a much more extensive use of ‘authority’ than it does of the other tools of government (treasure and, to a lesser extent, nodality and organisation).

Drawing on sociological institutionalism (DiMaggio and Powell 1983, 1991) we have argued that membership of the EU exposes Member States to various types of pressures, such as coercive, mimetic and normative pressures, not least because the EU is an institutional environment in which Member States actively compete in their attempt to ‘upload’ their domestic policy arrangements (Héritier 1996). These types of pressures concern the super-systemic, systemic and sub-systemic levels of analysis (i.e. the normative order, rules of the political game and the organisational level respectively) but change is likely to reflect, to some extent at least, historically defined pre-existing domestic patterns (Krasner 1984, 1988; Page and Wouters 1995; Page 1998; Harmsen 1999). Having chosen the national policy style as our explanandum, we have identified - with Richardson et al. (1982), the two key dimensions of this notion: a government’s relations with societal actors

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Greece in the European Union
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Series Editor’s Preface xi
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Part I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - Greece 3
  • Part II - Distributive and Redistributive Policies 17
  • 2 - The Common Agricultural Policy in the Greek Context 19
  • 3 - Greek Regional Policy and the Process of Europeanisation, 1961-2000 35
  • Part III - Regulative Policies 49
  • 4 - The Implementation of Eu Environmental Policy in Greece 51
  • 5 - Eu Social Regulation in the Greek Context 61
  • Part IV - Constituent Policies 75
  • 6 - Greek Foreign Policy Since 1974 77
  • 7 - Greece and Economic and Monetary Union 86
  • Notes 105
  • Part V - Epilogue 111
  • 8 - From Accession to the Euro 113
  • 9 - Conclusion 139
  • References 148
  • Index 162
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 168

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.