The Grit beneath the Glitter: Tales from the Real Las Vegas

By Hal K. Rothman; Mike Davis | Go to book overview

NOTES

Epigraph: Charles P. Squires, “The Glory of Light: Half Century of Service” (MS [1955]), 1, University of Nevada, Las Vegas [henceforth cited as UNLV] Special Collections.

1
Las Vegas's postwar growth is examined in Eugene P. Moehring, Resort City in the Sunbelt: Las Vegas, 1930–1970 (Reno: University of Nevada Press, 1989).
2
Ibid., 31–72, as cited in Michael S. Green, “Understanding Nevada Today: The Southern Shift, ” Halcyon 16 (1994): 182–83.
3
See, e.g., William Robbins, Colony and Empire: The Capitalist Transformation of the American West (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1994); Richard White, It's Your Misfortune and None of My Own: A New History of the American West (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1991); and Patricia Nelson Limerick, The Legacy of Conquest: The Unbroken Past of the American West (New York: Norton, 1987). For the impact of the New Deal and World War II on the West, see Richard Lowitt, The New Deal and the West (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1984); and Gerald Nash, The American West Transformed: The Impact of the Second World War (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985).
4
The early history of electricity in Las Vegas is discussed in Charles P. Squires, “The Glory of Light” and “Nevada Power Company, ” Livewire, Diamond Anniversary Edition, Seventy-Five Years of Service, 1906–1981 (Las Vegas, 1981), UNLV Special Collections. “Southern” was dropped from the companies' names in 1961. For the sake of clarity, “Nevada Power Company” is used throughout this essay.
5
In the first decades of the twentieth century, electricity was commonly measured in horsepower instead of kilowatts. One horsepower of electricity equals 746 watts of electricity, or .746 kilowatts. Electrical consumption is normally measured in kilowatt-hours; a kilowatt of power equals 1.34 horsepower. One kilowatt-hour of electricity is required to burn ten one-hundred-watt light bulbs for one hour.
6
Livewire (cited n. 4 above), “Power and Telephone Split. ”
7
Ibid. Edward W. Clark was not related to the William Clark for whom Clark County is named.
8
Federal Power Commission, Bureau of Power, San Francisco Regional Office in Cooperation with Colorado River Commission of Nevada, Power Market Survey, State of Nevada (n.p., 1949), 66, UNLV Special Collections. The term “firm power” refers to the amount of energy that is always available from a generator. Generators rarely produce at full capacity. Reduced turbine speed at hydroelectric dams due to low water can influence power production, as can decreased pressure at steam plants. Some energy loss is also inherent in electrical systems.
9
“Nevada's Power Needs and Hoover Dam, ” Las Vegas Review-Journal, October 24, 1976. Although the article does not mention it, Herbert Hoover and Secretary of the Interior Ray Lyman Wilbur had been classmates at Stanford.

-112-

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