Latinos: Remaking America

By Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco; Mariela M. Páez | Go to book overview

Epilogue
Problematic Paradigms
Racial Diversity and Corporate
Identity in the Latino Community
Silvio Torres-Saillant

BORDERS THAT EXIST

The presumption of a seamless, unproblematic Latino identity militates against the unity that U. S. Hispanic communities could and should forge in order to increase their levels of empowerment in American society. The potential for building coalitions, fashioning collaborative agendas, and joining forces in causes of common interest can become a reality only through serious reflection, inclusive dialogue, and tactful planning. Simply to assume Latino unity is to forgo the hard work, long time, and deep thought that bringing it about will take. A good number of scholars and intellectuals have already warned against the danger of uncritically embracing homogenizing discourses in defining the Hispanic subsection of the American population (Klor de Alva, West, and Shorris 1988; Oboler 1995; Flores and Yudice 1993; Davis 2000). Juan Flores and George Yudice have described Hispanics in the United States as a “very heterogeneous medley of races and nationalities, ” composing not “even a relatively homogeneous 'ethnicity'” (p. 199). These authors and many others have abundantly shown that promoting totalizing representations of the Latino community overlooks the differentiated cultural contributions and the particular social legacy that each individual subgroup has brought to the large canvas of American society. The disadvantages have thus far been articulated in terms of the levels of material or symbolic power that a homogenizing representation can cause Hispanics to lose or fail to acquire vis-à-vis American society's non-Latino political and economic mainstream. But no one, to my knowledge, has alerted us to what is perhaps an even graver danger: the debilitating impact that such representations can have on the ability of individual subgroups to fend off intra-Latino injustices.

-435-

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Latinos: Remaking America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction - The Research Agenda 1
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Part One - Histories, Migrations, and Communities 39
  • Chapter 1 - Latino History in the New Millennium 45
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 2 - Caribbean Latinos in Historical Perspective 59
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 3 - Miami Cubans 75
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Commentary 93
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 4 - Community Dynamics and the Rise of Street Gangs 97
  • References *
  • Chapter 5 - Gender, Ethnicity, and Race in School and Work Outcomes of Second-Generation Mexican Americans 110
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Chapter 6 - Mutual Transformation 126
  • Notes *
  • Commentary 146
  • Chapter 7 - Latino Religious Life in the United States 150
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Chapter 8 - Mass Public Responses to the “new” Latino Immigration to the United States 165
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Chapter 9 - The Effects of 1996 U. S. Immigration Reform on Communities and Families in Texas, El Salvador, and Mexico 190
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Commentary 202
  • References *
  • Part Two - Health, Families, Languages, Education, and Politics 207
  • Chapter 10 - The Latino Health Research Agenda for the Twenty-First Century 215
  • References *
  • Chapter 11 - Latinos' Access to Employment-Based Health Insurance 236
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Commentary 254
  • Chapter 12 - From Braceros in the Fields to Braceras in the Home 259
  • References *
  • Chapter 13 - Risk and Resilience in Latino Immigrant Families 274
  • References *
  • Chapter 14 - The Plasticity of Culture and Psychodynamic and Psychosocial Processes in Latino Immigrant Families 289
  • References *
  • Commentary 302
  • References *
  • Chapter 15 - Mapping the Research Agenda 306
  • Note *
  • References *
  • Chapter 16 - Latin@ Languages and Identities 321
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Chapter 17 - Guideposts for the Nation 339
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Commentary 359
  • Chapter 18 - The Schooling of Latino Children 362
  • Notes *
  • References 372
  • Chapter 19 - Affirmative Action, X Percent Plans, and Latino Access to Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century 375
  • References *
  • Commentary 389
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 20 - Latino Participation in American Elections 398
  • Note *
  • References *
  • Chapter 21 - Gender and Citizenship in Latino Political Participation 410
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Commentary 430
  • Note *
  • Epilogue - Racial Diversity and Corporate Identity in the Latino Community 435
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Afterword - American Projections 457
  • Notes *
  • Notes on Contributors 463
  • Index 467
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